DEPARTMENT OF LICENSING AND REGULATORY AFFAIRS  
DIRECTOR'S OFFICE  
GENERAL INDUSTRY SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARD  
(By authority conferred on the director of the department of licensing and regulatory  
affairs by sections 16 and 21 of 1974 PA 154, MCL 408.1016 and 408.1021, and  
Executive Reorganization Order Nos. 1996-2, 2003-1, 2008-4, and 2011-4, MCL  
445.2001, 445.2011, 445.2025, and 445.2030)  
GENERAL INDUSTRY SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARD  
PART 33. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT  
GENERAL PROVISIONS  
R 408.13301. Scope.  
Rule 3301. (1) This standard applies to all places of general industry employment in  
this state and includes requirements of the employer and use by the employee of personal  
protective equipment and provides reasonable and adequate means, ways, and methods  
for the proper selection and safe use of this equipment.  
(2) This standard establishes performance, care, and use criteria for all personal fall  
protection systems.  
(3) An employer shall ensure that each personal fall protection system used to  
comply with MIOSHA general industry safety and health standards meets the  
requirements of these rules.  
(4) Hearing protection shall be in compliance with Occupational Health Standard  
Part 380 “Occupational Noise Exposure in General Industry,” as referenced in  
R 408.13301a.  
(5) Respiratory protection shall be in compliance with Occupational Health Standard  
Part 451 “Respiratory Protection,” as referenced in R 408.13301a.  
History: 1983 AACS; 2014 AACS; 2016 AACS; 2018 AACS.  
R 408.13301a Adopted and referenced standards.  
Rule 3301a. (1) The following standards are adopted by reference in these rules and  
are available from IHS Global, 15 Inverness Way East, Englewood, Colorado, 80112,  
of adoption of these rules, as stated in these rules.  
(a) American National Standards Institute Standard (ANSI) Z-41 "American  
National Standard for Personal Protection -- Protective Footwear," 1999 edition. Cost  
$25.00.  
(b) ANSI/ISEA (International Safety Equipment Association) Z-87.1 “Occupational  
and Educational Personal Eye and Face Protection Devices,” 2010 edition. Cost $60.00.  
Page 1  
(c) ANSI Z-87.1 “Occupational and Educational Personal Eye and Face Protection  
Devices,” 2003 edition. Cost $68.00.  
(d) ANSI Z-87.1 “Practice for Occupational and Educational Eye and Face  
Protection,” 1989 edition, revised 1998. Cost: $148.00.  
(e) American Society of Testing Materials Standard (ASTM) D-120 “Standard  
Specification for Rubber Insulating Gloves,” 2009 edition. Cost: $58.00.  
(f) ASTM D-178 “Standard Specification for Rubber Insulating Matting,” 2001  
edition with 2010 supplement. Cost $47.00.  
(g) ASTM D-178 “Standard Specification for Rubber Insulating Matting,” 1993  
edition. Cost $56.00.  
(h) ASTM D-1048 “Standard Specification for Rubber Insulating Blankets,” 2012  
edition. Cost $47.00.  
(i) ASTM D-1049 “Standard Specification for Rubber Insulating Covers,” 1998  
edition with 2010 supplement. Cost $47.00.  
(j) ASTM D-1050 “Standard Specification for Rubber Insulating Line Hose,” 2005  
edition with 2011 supplement. Cost $47.00.  
(k) ASTM D-1051 “Standard Specification for Rubber Insulating Sleeves,” 2008  
edition. Cost $58.00.  
(l) ASTM F-478 “Standard Specification for In-Service Care of Insulating Line  
Hose and Covers,” 2009 edition. Cost $52.00.  
(m) ASTM F-479 “Standard Specification for In-Service Care of Insulating  
Blankets,” 2006 edition with 2011 supplement. Cost: $47.00.  
(n) ASTM F-496 “Standard Specification for In-Service Care of Insulating Gloves  
and Sleeves,” 2008 edition. Cost $58.00.  
(o) ASTM F-2412 “Standard Test Methods for Foot Protection,” 2005 edition. Cost  
$64.00.  
(p) ASTM F-2413 “Standard Specification for Performance Requirements for  
Protective Footwear,” 2005 edition. Cost $56.00.  
(q) ASTM F-819 “Standard Terminology Relating to Electrical Protective  
Equipment for Workers,” 2010 edition. Cost $41.00.  
(r) ASTM F-1236 “Standard Guide for Visual Inspection of Electrical Protective  
Rubber Products,” 1996 edition with 2012 supplement. Cost: $47.00.  
(s) Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers IEEE Standard 516 “Guide for  
Maintenance Methods on Energized Power Lines,” 2009 edition. Cost: $135.00.  
(2) The following standards are adopted by reference in these rules and are available  
from Document Center, Inc., Customer Service, 121 Industrial Road, Suite 8, Belmont,  
CA 94002, USA, telephone:(650) 591-7600 or via the internet at website:  
these rules.  
(a) ANSI Z-89.1 "American National Standard for Industrial Head Protection," 2009  
edition. Cost $61.25.  
(b) ANSI Z-89.1 "American National Standard for Industrial Head Protection," 2003  
edition. Cost: $20.00.  
(c) ANSI Z-89.1 "American National Standard for Personnel Protection—Protective  
Headwear for Industrial Workers--Requirements," 1997 edition. Cost: $20.00.  
Page 2  
(3) The standards adopted in these rules are available for inspection at the  
Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs, MIOSHA Regulatory Services Section,  
P.O. Box 30643, Lansing, Michigan, 48909-8143.  
(4) Copies of the standards adopted in these rules may be obtained from the  
publisher or may be obtained from the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs,  
MIOSHA Regulatory Services Section, P.O. Box 30643, Lansing, Michigan,  
48909-8143, at the cost charged in this rule, plus $20.00 for shipping and handling.  
(5) The following Michigan Occupational Safety and Health (MIOSHA) standards  
are referenced in these rules. Up to 5 copies of these standards may be obtained at no  
charge from the Michigan Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs, MIOSHA  
Regulatory Services section, P.O. Box 30643, Lansing, MI, 48909-8143 or via the  
the cost, at the time of adoption of these rules, is 4 cents per page.  
(a) Occupational Health Standard Part 380 “Occupational Noise Exposure in  
General Industry” R 325.60101 to R 325.30128.  
(b) Occupational Health Standard Part 451 “Respiratory Protection,” R 325.60051 to  
R 325.60052.  
(c) General Industry Safety and Health Standard Part 50 “Telecommunications,”  
R 408.15001 to R 408.15004.  
(d) General Industry Safety and Health Standard Part 86 “Electric Power  
Generation, Transmission, and Distribution,” R 408.18601 to R 408.18605.  
(6) The appendices are informational only and are not intended to create any  
additional obligations or requirements not otherwise imposed or to detract from any  
established obligations or requirements.  
History: 2014 AACS; 2015 AACS; 2016 AACS; 2018 AACS.  
R 408.13302 Definitions, A to E.  
Rule 3302. (1) “Absorptive lens” means a filter lens whose physical properties are  
designed to attenuate the effect of glare, reflective, and stray light.  
(2) “Anchorage” means a secure point of attachment for equipment such as lifelines,  
lanyards, or deceleration devices.  
(3) “Apparatus” means electrical equipment.  
(4) “Bare hand technique” means a method of working on energized conductors by  
isolating the employee from any ground potential and by placing the employee in  
continuous firm contact with the energized electric field.  
(5) “Belt terminal” means an end attachment of a window cleaner’s positioning  
system used for securing the belt or harness to a window cleaner’s belt anchor.  
(6) “Body belt” means a strap with means both for securing about the waist and for  
attaching to other components such as a lanyard used with positioning systems, travel  
restraint systems, or ladder safety systems.  
(7) “Body harness” means straps that secure about the employee in a manner to  
distribute the fall arrest forces over at least the thighs, pelvis, waist, chest, and shoulders,  
with a means for attaching the harness to other components of a personal fall protection  
system.  
Page 3  
(8) “Bump hat or cap” means a device worn on the head to protect the wearer from  
bumps or blows but which does not meet the requirements of protective helmets.  
(9) “Carabiner” means a connector generally comprised of a trapezoidal or oval  
shaped body with a closed gate or similar arrangement that may be opened to attach  
another object and, when released, automatically closes to retain the object.  
(10) “Chin protector” means the portion of a device that offers protection to a  
wearer’s chin, lower face, and neck.  
(11) “Competent person” means a person who is capable of identifying existing and  
predictable hazards in any personal fall protection system or any component of it, as well  
as in their application and uses with related equipment, and who has authorization to take  
prompt, corrective action to eliminate the identified hazards.  
(12) “Conductor” means a material, such as a bus bar, wire, or cable, suitable for  
carrying an electric current.  
(13) “Connector” means a device used to couple or connect parts of the fall  
protection system together.  
(14) “Corrective lens” means a lens ground to the wearer’s individual prescription.  
(15) “Cover lens” means a removable disc or colorless glass, plastic-coated glass, or  
plastic that covers a filter lens and protects it from weld spatter, pitting, or scratching  
when used in a goggle.  
(16) “Cover plate” means a removable pane of colorless glass, plastic-coated glass,  
or plastic that covers a filter plate and protects it from weld spatter, pitting, or scratching  
when used in a helmet, hood, or goggle.  
(17) “D-ring” means a connector used on any of the following:  
(a) In a harness as an integral attachment element or fall arrest attachment.  
(b) In a lanyard, energy absorber, lifeline, or anchorage connector as an integral  
connector.  
(c) In a positioning or travel restraint system as an attachment element.  
(18) “Deceleration device” means any mechanism that serves to dissipate energy  
during a fall.  
(19) “Deceleration distance” means the vertical distance a falling employee travels  
from the point at which the deceleration device begins to operate, excluding lifeline  
elongation and free fall distance, until stopping. It is measured as the distance between  
the location of an employee's body harness attachment point at the moment of activation,  
at the onset of fall arrest forces, of the deceleration device during a fall, and the location  
of that attachment point after the employee comes to a full stop.  
(20) “Energized”, also known as “live”, means to be electrically charged, or that to  
which voltage is being applied.  
(21) Equivalent means alternative designs, equipment, materials, or methods that the  
employer can demonstrate will provide an equal or greater degree of safety for employees  
compared to the designs, equipment, materials, or methods specified in the standard.  
(22) “Eye size” means a measurement expressed in millimeters and denoting the size  
of the lens-holding section of an eye frame.  
History: 1983 AACS; 2014 AACS; 2018 AACS.  
Page 4  
R 408.13303. Definitions; F, G.  
Rule 3303. (1) “Face shield” means a device worn in front of the eyes and a portion  
or all of the face, whose predominant function is protection of the eyes and face.  
(2) “Filter lens” means a lens that attenuates specific wavelengths of ultraviolet,  
visible, and infrared radiation according to the composition and density of the lens.  
(3) “Filter plate” means a removable pane in the window of a helmet, hood, or  
goggle that absorbs varying proportions of the ultraviolet, visible, and infrared rays  
according to the composition and density of the plate.  
(4) “Foot or toe protection” means a device or equipment, such as, but not limited to,  
safety toe footwear, toe protectors, or foot guards, that protects an employee’s foot or  
toes against injury.  
(5) “Footwear” means apparel worn on the feet, such as shoes, boots, slippers, or  
overshoes, excluding hosiery.  
(6) “Frame” means a device which holds the lens or lenses on the wearer.  
(7) “Free fall” means the act of falling before the personal fall arrest system begins  
to apply force to arrest the fall.  
(8) “Free fall distance” means the vertical displacement of the fall arrest attachment  
point on the employee's body belt or body harness between onset of the fall and just  
before the system begins to apply force to arrest the fall. This distance excludes  
deceleration distance, lifeline and lanyard elongation, but includes any deceleration  
device slide distance or self-retracting lifeline and or lanyard extension before the devices  
operate and fall arrest forces occur.  
(9) “Front” means the part of a spectacle or goggle frame that is intended to contain  
the lens or lenses.  
(10) “Goggle” means a device with contour-shaped eyecups or facial contact with  
glass or plastic lenses, worn over the eyes and held in place by a headband or other  
suitable means for the protection of the eyes and eye sockets.  
History: 1983 AACS; 2014 AACS; 2018 AACS.  
R 408.13304. Definitions; H, I.  
Rule 3304. (1) “Hair enclosure” means a hat, cap, or hair net specifically designed to  
protect the wearer from hair entanglement in moving machinery.  
(2) “Handshield” means a hand-held welding helmet. See “welding helmet.”  
(3) “Headband” means that part of a goggle, helmet, or hood suspension consisting  
of a supporting band that encircles the head.  
(4) “Headgear” means that part of a protective helmet, hood, or faceshield that  
supports the device on the wearer’s head, usually consisting of a headband and crown  
strap.  
(5) “Helmet” also called a hard hat or cap, means a device that is worn on the head  
that is designed to provide limited protection against impact, flying particles, or electric  
shock.  
(6) “Hood” means a device that is worn to provide protection against acids,  
chemicals, abrasives, and temperature extremes and entirely encloses the whole head  
including face, neck, and shoulders. Air-line hoods and hoods used to protect wearers  
from inhalation or harmful atmospheres are not included in this part.  
Page 5  
(7) “Isolated” means that all energized conductors or the exposed energized parts of  
equipment are isolated from the work area by an insulated barrier. Conductors may be  
isolated by moving them out of reaching distance by use of hot line tools.  
History: 1983 AACS; 2014 AACS; 2016 AACS.  
R 408.13305. Definitions; L to R.  
Rule 3305. (1) “Lanyard” means a flexible line of rope, wire rope, or strap that  
generally has a connector at each end for connecting the body belt or body harness to a  
deceleration device, lifeline, or anchorage.  
(2) “Lens” means the transparent part of a protective device through which the  
wearer sees, also referred to as a plate or window for some devices.  
(3) “Lifeline” means a component of a personal fall protection system consisting of  
a flexible line for connection to an anchorage at one end so as to hang vertically, vertical  
lifeline, or for connection to anchorages at both ends so as to stretch horizontally,  
horizontal lifeline, and serves as a means for connecting other components of the system  
to the anchorage.  
(4) “Lift-front” means a type of mounting frame for a welding helmet, hood, or  
goggles which is made of 2 connected parts. The front part, which may be removed from  
the line of vision, contains the high density filter plate with its cover plate, and the back  
part, which is fixed to the helmet, contains a low density or clear impact-resistant plate.  
(5) “Light” means an optical radiation weighted by its ability to cause visual  
sensations.  
(6) “Manufacturer” means a business entity that marks or directs the permanent  
marking of the components or complete devices as compliant with this standard, and sells  
them as compliant.  
(7) “Metatarsal guards” means guards that are designed to protect the top of the foot  
from the toes to the ankle over the instep of the foot. These guards may be attached to the  
outside of shoes.  
(8) “Non-removable lens” means a lens and holder that are homogeneous and  
continuous.  
(9) “Personal fall arrest system” means a system used to arrest an employee in a fall  
from a walking-working surface. It consists of a body harness, anchorage, and connector.  
The means of connection may include a lanyard, deceleration device, lifeline, or a  
suitable combination of these.  
(10) “Personal fall protection system” means a system, including all components, an  
employer uses to provide protection from falling or to safely arrest an employee’s fall if  
one occurs. Examples of personal fall protection systems include personal fall arrest  
systems, positioning systems, and travel restraint systems.  
(11) “Plano lens” means a lens that does not incorporate a corrective prescription.  
This lens is not necessarily flat.  
(12) “Positioning system”, also known as work-positioning system, means a system  
of equipment and connectors that, when used with a body harness or body belt, allows an  
employee to be supported on an elevated vertical surface, such as a wall or window sill,  
and work with both hands free. Positioning systems are also known as “positioning  
system devices” and “work-positioning equipment.”  
Page 6  
(13) “Prescription lens” means a lens manufactured to the wearer’s individual  
corrective prescription.  
(14) “Protective footwear” means footwear that is designed, constructed, and  
classified to protect the wearer from a potential hazard or hazards.  
(15) “Protective helmet,” “protective hat or cap,” or “safety hat or cap” means a  
rigid device, often referred to as a safety cap or hat, that is worn to provide protection for  
the head or portions thereof against impact, flying particles, or electric shock, or any  
combination thereof, and which is held in place by a suitable suspension.  
(16) “Protector” means a device that provides eye or face protection against the  
hazards of processes encountered in employment.  
(17) “Qualified” means a person who, by possession of a recognized degree,  
certificate, or professional standing, or who by extensive knowledge, training, and  
experience has successfully demonstrated the ability to solve or resolve problems relating  
to the subject matter, the work, or the project.  
(18) “Radiant energy or radiation” means the following kinds of radiant energy that  
are pertinent to this standard:  
(a) Ultraviolet.  
(b) Visible light.  
(c) Infrared.  
(19) “Reaching distance” means the employee’s reach as extended by a conductive  
material or equipment.  
(20) “Rope grab” means a deceleration device that travels on a lifeline and  
automatically, by friction, engages the lifeline and locks so as to arrest the fall of an  
employee. A rope grab usually employs the principle of inertial locking, cam/lever  
locking, or both.  
History: 1983 AACS; 2014 AACS; 2016 AACS; 2018 AACS.  
R 408.13306. Definitions; S to W.  
Rule 3306. (1) “Safety belt” means a device, usually worn around the waist that by  
reason of its attachment to a lanyard and lifeline or a structure, will prevent a worker  
from falling.  
(2) “Safety factor” means the ratio of the design load and the ultimate strength of the  
material.  
(3) “Safety harness” means a belt with a shoulder strap worn around the waist and  
shoulder and capable of restraining a pull or fall of an employee.  
(4) “Safety strap” means a restraining line secured at both ends to a safety belt or  
harness to hold an employee to a fixed object.  
(5) “Safety toe footwear” means footwear containing a safety toe box of steel or  
equivalent material capable of meeting the requirements of this part.  
(6) “Sanitizing” means an act or process of destroying organisms that may cause  
disease.  
(7) “Self-retracting lifeline or lanyard” means a deceleration device containing a  
drum-wound line that can be slowly extracted from, or retracted onto, the drum under  
slight tension during normal movement by the employee. At the onset of a fall, the device  
automatically locks the drum and arrests the fall.  
Page 7  
(8) “Shield” means a device to be held in the hand, or supported without the aid of  
the operator, whose predominant function is protection of the eyes and face.  
(9) “Shell” means the portion of welding helmet or handshield that covers the  
wearer’s face and is the part of a helmet which includes the outermost surface.  
(10) “Side shield” means a part of, or attachment to, a spectacle that provides side  
impact-resistance.  
(11) “Snaphook” means a connector comprised of a hook-shaped body with a  
normally closed gate, or similar arrangement that may be manually opened to permit the  
hook to receive an object. When released, the snaphook automatically closes to retain the  
object. Opening a snaphook requires 2 separate actions. Snaphooks are generally either of  
the following types:  
(a) Automatic-locking type, which is permitted, with a self-closing and self-locking  
gate that remains closed and locked until intentionally unlocked and opened for  
connection or disconnection.  
(b) Non-locking type, which is prohibited, with a self-closing gate that remains  
closed, but not locked, until intentionally opened for connection or disconnection.  
(12) “Snood” means a flexible attachment to the back of a hood or helmet for  
protection against injury to the back of the head and neck.  
(13) “Spectacles”, also known as safety glasses, means a protective device intended  
to shield the wearer’s eyes from certain hazards, depending on the spectacle type; also  
means a device patterned after conventional-type spectacle eyewear, but of more  
substantial construction, with or without sideshields, and with plano or corrective  
impact-resistant lenses of clear or absorptive filter glass or plastic.  
(14) “Temple” means the part of a spectacle frame commonly attached to the front  
and generally extending behind the ear of the wearer.  
(15) “Toe guards” means the guards that fit over the toes of regular shoes to protect  
the toes from impact and compression hazards. These guards may be attached to the  
outside of shoes.  
(16) “Travel restraint,” also known as a tether line, means a rope or wire rope used  
to transfer forces from a body support to an anchorage or anchorage connector in a travel  
restraint system.  
(17) “Travel restraint system” means a combination of an anchorage, anchorage  
connector, lanyard or other means of connection, and body support that an employer uses  
to eliminate the possibility of an employee going over the edge of a walking-working  
surface.  
(18) “Welding goggle” means a goggle intended for limited welding applications.  
(19) “Welding faceshield” means a faceshield intended for limited welding  
applications. Faceshields shall be used only in conjunction with spectacles or goggles, or  
both.  
(20) “Welding helmet” means a protective device intended to provide protection for  
the eyes and face against optical radiation and weld spatter, which shall be worn only in  
conjunction with spectacles or goggles.  
(21) “Window” means the lens portion of a face shield. Lens is defined in  
R 408.13305(2).  
(22) “Window cleaner’s belt” means a positioning belt that consists of a waist belt,  
an integral terminal runner or strap, and belt terminals.  
Page 8  
(23) “Window cleaner’s belt anchor”, also known as window anchor, means  
specifically designed fall-preventing attachment points permanently affixed to a window  
frame or to a building part immediately adjacent to the window frame, for direct  
attachment of the terminal portion of a window cleaner’s belt.  
(24) “Window cleaner's positioning system” means a system that consists of a  
window cleaner's belt secured to window anchors.  
(25) “Work-positioning system” means the same as “positioning system.”  
History: 1983 AACS; 2014 AACS; 2016 AACS; 2018 AACS.  
HAZARD ASSESSMENT  
R 408.13308. Personal protective hazard assessment and equipment selection.  
Rule 3308. (1) An employer shall assess the workplace to determine if hazards are  
present, or are likely to be present, that necessitate the use of personal protective  
equipment.  
(2) If the hazards are present or are likely to be present then the employer shall do  
all of the following:  
(a) Select, and have each affected employee use, the types of personal protective  
equipment that will protect the affected employee from the hazards identified in the  
hazard assessment.  
(b) Communicate selection decisions to each affected employee.  
(c) Select the personal protective equipment that properly fits each affected  
employee.  
(d) Select personal protective equipment that shall be designed and constructed to be  
safe for the work to be performed.  
Note: Non-mandatory Appendix B contains an example of procedures that complies  
with the requirement for a hazard assessment.  
(3) An employer shall verify that the required workplace hazard assessment has been  
performed through a written certification which identifies all of the following  
information:  
(a) The workplace evaluated.  
(b) The person certifying that the evaluation has been performed.  
(c) The date or dates of the personal protective hazard assessment.  
(d) The document is a certification of hazard assessment.  
History: 1995 AACS; 2014 AACS.  
TRAINING  
R 408.13309. Personal protective equipment training.  
Page 9  
Rule 3309. (1) An employer shall provide training to each employee who is required  
by these rules to use personal protective equipment. The training shall include all of the  
following:  
(a) When personal protective equipment is necessary.  
(b) What personal protective equipment is necessary.  
(c) How to properly don, doff, adjust, and wear the personal protective equipment.  
(d) The limitations of the personal protective equipment.  
(e) The proper care, maintenance, useful life, and disposal of the personal protective  
equipment.  
(2) Each affected employee shall demonstrate an understanding of the training specified  
in subrule (1) of this rule and the ability to use the equipment properly before being  
allowed to perform work requiring the use of personal protective equipment.  
(3) When an employer has reason to believe that any affected employee who  
has already been trained does not have the understanding and skill required by  
subrule (2) of this rule, the employer shall retrain the employee. The occurrence of  
any of the following circumstances requires retraining:  
(a) Changes in the workplace that render previous training obsolete.  
(b) Changes in the types of personal protective equipment to be used that render  
previous training obsolete.  
(c) Inadequacies in an affected employee’s knowledge or use of assigned personal  
protective equipment which indicate that the employee has not retained the requisite  
understanding or skill.  
History: 1995 AACS; 2014 AACS.  
R 408.13310. Employer’s and employee’s responsibilities.  
Rule 3310. (1) An employer shall not permit defective or damaged personal protective  
equipment to be used.  
(2) An employee shall use all of the personal protective equipment provided by the  
employer.  
History: 1983 AACS; 1989 AACS; 2014 AACS.  
PAYMENT FOR PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT  
R 408.13310a. Payment for personal protective equipment (PPE).  
Rule 3310a. (1) An employer shall provide at no cost to employees the personal  
protective equipment necessary to protect against hazards that the employer is aware of  
as a result of any required assessments.  
(2) An employer shall pay for replacement PPE, as necessary, under either of the  
following conditions:  
(a) When the PPE no longer provides the protection it was designed to provide.  
(b) When the previously provided PPE is no longer adequate or functional.  
Page 10  
(3) When an employee has lost or intentionally damaged the PPE issued to him or  
her, an employer is not required to pay for its replacement and may require the employee  
to pay for its replacement.  
(4) An employer is not required to pay for prescription safety eyewear with  
removable or permanent sideshields if the employer provides safety eyewear that fits over  
an employee’s prescription lenses.  
(5) An employer is not required to pay for non-specialty prescription safety eyewear,  
provided that the employer permits these items to be worn off the job-site.  
(6) An employer is not required to pay for non-specialty safety-toe protective  
footwear, including steel-toe shoes or steel-toe boots, provided that the employer permits  
these items to be worn off the job-site.  
(7) An employer shall provide, at no cost to employees, metatarsal guards attachable  
to shoes when metatarsal protection is necessary if both the following apply:  
(a) If metatarsal protection is necessary and an employer requires employees to use  
metatarsal shoes instead of detachable guards, then the employer shall provide the  
metatarsal shoe at no cost to the employee.  
(b) If an employer provides metatarsal guards and allows the employee, at his or her  
request, to use shoes or boots with built-in metatarsal protection, then the employer is not  
required to pay for the metatarsal shoes or boots.  
(8) An employer is not required to pay for either of the following:  
(a) Everyday clothing, including any of the following:  
(i) Long-sleeve shirts.  
(ii) Long pants.  
(iii) Street shoes.  
(iv) Normal work boots.  
(v) Ordinary clothing.  
(vi) Skin creams.  
(b) Other items used solely for protection from weather, including any of the  
following:  
(i) Winter coats.  
(ii) Jackets.  
(iii) Gloves.  
(iv) Parkas.  
(v) Rubber boots.  
(vi) Hats.  
(vii) Raincoats.  
(viii) Ordinary sunglasses.  
(ix) Sunscreen.  
(9) An employer shall pay for protection when ordinary weather gear is not  
sufficient to protect an employee and special equipment or extraordinary clothing is  
needed to protect the employee from unusually severe weather conditions. Clothing used  
in artificially-controlled environments with extreme hot or cold temperatures, such as  
freezers, is not considered part of the weather gear exception.  
(10) All of the following apply to upgraded and personalized PPE:  
Page 11  
(a) An employer is not required to pay for PPE requested by an employee that  
exceeds the PPE requirements, provided that the employer provides PPE that meets the  
standards at no cost to the employee.  
(b) If an employer allows an employee to acquire and use upgraded or personalized  
PPE, then the employer is not required to reimburse the employee for the equipment,  
provided that the employer has provided adequate PPE at no cost to the employee.  
(c) An employer shall evaluate an employee’s upgraded or personalized PPE to  
ensure that it complies with all of the following:  
(i) Is adequate to protect from hazards present in the workplace.  
(ii) Is properly maintained.  
(iii) Is kept in a sanitary condition.  
(11) If the provisions of another MIOSHA standard specify that the employer shall pay  
for specific equipment, then the payment provisions of that standard prevails.  
History: 2014 AACS.  
EYE AND FACE PROTECTION  
R 408.13311. Eye and face protection; consensus standards.  
Rule 3311. (1) All protective eye and face protection devices shall be in compliance  
with any of the following consensus standards:  
(a) ANSI/ISEA Z-87.1 “Occupational and Educational Personal Eye and Face  
Protection Devices,” 2010 edition, as adopted in R 408.13301a.  
(b) ANSI Z-87.1 “Occupational and Educational Personal Eye and Face Protection  
Devices,” 2003 edition, as adopted in R 408.13301a.  
(c) ANSI Z-87.1 “Practice for Occupational and Educational Eye and Face  
Protection,” 1989 edition, revised 1998, as adopted in R 408.13301a.  
(2) Protective eye and face protection devices that the employer demonstrates are at  
least as effective as protective eye and face protection devices that are constructed in  
accordance with 1 of the consensus standards adopted in subrule(1) of this rule are  
considered to be in compliance with this rule.  
History: 1983 AACS; 1995 AACS; 1997 AACS; 2014 AACS; 2016 AACS; 2018 AACS.  
R 408.13312. Use of eye and face protection.  
Rule 3312. (1) An employer shall ensure that each affected employee uses  
appropriate eye or face protection, when exposed to eye or face hazards from any of the  
following:  
(a) Flying objects or particles.  
(b) Harmful contacts.  
(c) Exposures.  
(d) Molten metal.  
(e) Liquid chemicals.  
(f) Acids or caustic liquids.  
Page 12  
(g) Chemical fumes, gases or vapors.  
(h) Glare.  
(i) Injurious radiation.  
(j) Electrical flash.  
(k) A combination of these hazards.  
Note: Appendix B, Appendix Table 1, “Eye and Face Protector Selection Chart,” and  
Appendix Figure 1, “Eye and Face Protective Devices Chart,” which shall be used as a  
guide in the selection of the proper eye and face protection.  
(2) An employer shall ensure that each affected employee uses eye protection that  
provides side protection when there is a hazard from flying objects. Detachable side  
protectors, such as clip-on or slide-on sideshields, that are in compliance with the  
pertinent requirements of this rule are acceptable.  
(3) A protector shall be in compliance with all of the following minimum requirements:  
(a) Provides adequate protection against the particular hazards for which it is designed.  
(b) Fits snugly and does not unduly interfere with movements of the wearer.  
(c) Is capable of withstanding sanitizing.  
(4) An employer shall ensure that eye and face personal protective equipment is  
distinctly marked to facilitate identification of the manufacturer.  
(5) Limitations or precautions indicated by the manufacturer shall be transmitted to the  
user and care taken to ensure that the limitations or precautions are observed.  
History: 1983 AACS; 1995 AACS; 1997 AACS; 2014 AACS.  
R 408.13312a. Filter lenses.  
Rule 3312a. (1) An employer shall ensure that each affected employee uses equipment  
that has filter lenses which have shade numbers appropriate for the work being performed  
for protection from injurious light radiation.  
(2) Table 1 is a listing of appropriate shade numbers for various operations.  
(3) Table 1 reads as follows:  
TABLE 1  
FILTER LENSES FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIANT ENERGY  
PLATE  
THICKNESS  
(INCHES)  
PLATE  
THICKNESS  
(MM)  
MINIMUM*  
PROTECTIVE  
SHADE  
OPERATIONS  
Gas Welding:  
Light  
Under 1/8  
1/8 to 1/2  
Over 1/2  
Under 3.2  
3.2 to 12.7  
Over 12.7  
4
5
6
Medium  
Heavy  
Oxygen Cutting  
Light  
Under 1  
1 to 6  
Over 6  
Under 25  
25 to 150  
Over 150  
3
4
5
Medium  
Heavy  
Page 13  
MINIMUM*  
PROTECTIVE  
ELECTRODE  
SIZE 1/32 IN.  
ARC  
CURRENT  
OPERATIONS  
SHADE  
Less than 3  
3 to 5  
more than 5 to 8  
more than 8  
Less than 60  
60 to 160  
161 to 250  
251 to 550  
Less than 60  
60 to 160  
161 to 250  
251 to 500  
Less than 50  
50 to 150  
7
8
10  
11  
7
10  
10  
10  
8
Shield metal  
Arc welding  
Gas  
metal  
arc  
cored arc  
welding  
welding and flux  
Gas tungsten arc  
welding  
8
151 to 500  
10  
Air carbon  
Arc cutting  
(Light)  
(Heavy)  
Less than 500  
500 to 1000  
10  
11  
Less than 20  
20 to 100  
6
8
Plasma arc  
welding  
101 to 400  
401 to 800  
Less than 300  
300 to 400  
401 to 800  
10  
11  
8
9
10  
(Light)**  
(Medium)**  
(Heavy)**  
Plasma arc  
cutting  
Torch brazing  
Torch soldering  
Carbon arc  
3
2
welding  
14  
* As a rule of thumb, start with a shade that is too dark to see the weld zone. Then go  
to a lighter shade that gives a sufficient view of the weld zone without going below the  
minimum. In oxyfuel gas welding or cutting where the torch produces a high yellow  
light, it is desirable to use a filter lens that absorbs the yellow or sodium line in the  
visible light of the (spectrum) operation.  
** These values apply where the actual arc is clearly seen. Experience has shown  
that light filters may be used when the arc is hidden by the workpiece.  
History: 2014 AACS.  
R 408.13313 Maintenance and cleanliness of protectors.  
Rule 3313. (1) A face or eye protector shall be kept clean and in good repair.  
(2) Cleaning facilities for protectors shall be provided away from the hazard, but  
readily accessible to the wearer.  
(3) A slack, worn out, sweat-soaked, knotted, or twisted headband shall be replaced.  
Page 14  
(4) A face or eye protector is a personal item and shall be for the individual and  
exclusive use of the person to whom it is issued. If circumstances require reissue, the  
protector shall be thoroughly cleaned, sanitized, and in good condition.  
History: 1983 AACS.  
WELDING HELMETS AND HAND SHIELDS  
R 408.13320 Purposes, types, styles, and marking.  
Rule 3320. (1) The devices described in R 408.13320 to R 408.13330 are designed  
to provide protection for the face, eyes, ears, and neck against intense radiant energy and  
spatter resulting from arc welding.  
(2) A helmet and a hand shield are the only permissible types.  
(3) A helmet and a hand shield shall be made with the same basic design and of the  
same basic materials: an opaque, bowl-shaped or modified bowl-shaped device  
containing a window with filter plate which allows the wearer to see the radiant object,  
yet prevents harmful intensities or radiation from reaching his eyes. A helmet shall be  
supported on the head by an adjustable headgear. A hand shield shall have a handle  
attached to the bottom by which it is held in the hand. The basic designs may be  
modified to provide protection against special hazards, but modified equipment shall  
meet the same requirements as the basic design.  
(4) A helmet and a hand shield shall bear a permanent and legible marking by  
which the manufacturer may be readily identified.  
History: 1983 AACS.  
R 408.13321 Rigid helmet bodies.  
Rule 3321. A helmet body of a rigid helmet shall be of such size and shape as to  
protect the face, forehead, ears, and neck to a vertical line back of the ears. It shall have 1  
or more openings in the front for filter plates or filter lenses. The helmet body shall be  
attached to the headgear so that it will not come in contact with any part of the head and  
so that it can be lifted up from in front of the face and hold its position in front of the  
head. The helmet body shall be made of vulcanized fiber, reinforced plastic, or other  
suitable material which shall be thermally insulating, noncombustible or slow-burning,  
opaque to visible, ultraviolet, and infrared radiations, and capable of withstanding  
sanitizing. The inside of the helmet body shall have a low-light reflecting finish. Rivets or  
other metal parts, if terminating on the inside surface, shall be adequately separated from  
the wearer's head.  
History: 1983 AACS; 2016 AACS.  
R 408.13322 Rigid helmet headgear or cradles.  
Page 15  
Rule 3322. A rigid helmet shall have a headgear or cradle that shall hold the helmet  
body comfortably and firmly on the wearer's head, but shall permit the helmet body to be  
tilted back over the head. The headgear shall be readily adjustable for all head sizes from  
6 1/2 to 7 5/8, without the use of tools. The headgear shall be made of materials which  
are thermally insulating, noncombustible or slow-burning, resistant to heat, and capable  
of withstanding sanitizing. Where required, the headgear shall be fitted with a removable  
and replaceable sweatband covering at least the forehead portion of the headband. The  
sweatband shall be made of leather or other suitable material which is slow-burning and  
non-irritating.  
History: 1983 AACS; 2016 AACS.  
R 408.13323 Rigid helmet headgear substitutes.  
Rule 3323. A headgear for a rigid helmet may be replaced by an impact-  
resistant hat or cap that meets the requirements of R 408.13370 and R 408.13378 of this  
part, or other suitable device to which the helmet body is connected, if the helmet body  
may be lifted and adjusted to permit unobstructed vision or lowered to furnish  
complete protection,  
as required. The alternative device shall meet the  
requirements for sanitizing and resistance to heat and, in addition, shall meet the  
applicable requirements of any additional functions, such as protection against falling  
objects.  
History: 1983 AACS.  
R 408.13324 Rigid helmet filter plates.  
Rule 3324. (1) A filter plate on a rigid helmet shall fit into the frame and cover the  
window.  
(2) Both surfaces of a filter plate shall be well polished and shall be free from striae,  
waves, or other defects that would impair the optical quality of the surfaces. Filter plate  
surfaces shall be flat and substantially parallel.  
(3) Table 2 of R 408.13312 shall be used to select the proper shade number of filter  
lenses or plates during welding operations.  
(4) When specified, a filter plate shall be impact-resistant, unless impact-resistant  
eye protection is worn in conjunction with a welding helmet.  
(5) A filter plate shall be marked with the shade designation and a permanent and  
legible marking by which the manufacturer may be readily identified. In addition, a glass  
filter plate, when treated for impact-resistance, shall be marked with the letter "H."  
(6) A cover plate made of plain glass, of glass coated on 1 or on both sides with  
plastic, or of a slow-burning solid plastic sheet shall be used to protect a filter plate from  
damage. A cover plate shall be the same peripheral size and shape as the filter plate, and  
the thickness of a cover plate shall not be less than 0.050 inches. A cover plate shall  
transmit not less than 75% of the luminous radiation and shall be substantially free from  
optical imperfections.  
History: 1983 AACS; 1995 AACS; 2016 AACS.  
Page 16  
R 408.13325 Non-rigid helmets.  
Rule 3325. A helmet may be made of non-rigid materials where it is to be used in  
confined spaces, or may be collapsible for convenience in carrying or storing. The helmet  
may be of the same general shape as a rigid helmet, except that a more complete covering  
of the top of the head is necessary in order to maintain the face, side, and windows in  
proper position. The requirements for the filter plates, cover plates, and lens mounting  
frame are the same as for a rigid helmet. A headgear may be used. The material shall be  
non-conducting and opaque to ultraviolet, visible, and infrared radiations. Stitched seams  
shall be welded. Stitching shall not be exposed.  
History: 1983 AACS; 2016 AACS; 2018 AACS.  
R 408.13327 Hand shield.  
Rule 3327. A hand shield shall be constructed of materials similar to those used for a  
helmet and in like manner. The materials, lens mounting arrangement, and filter and  
cover plates shall conform to the requirements for the corresponding parts of the helmet  
body with headgear. The handle shall be made of a material that is a non-conductor of  
electricity and is noncombustible or slow-burning. It shall be of such size and shape as to  
be held easily by 1 hand and shall be firmly attached to the lower portion of the shield. A  
hand shield intended for use by other than a welding operator shall have filter and cover  
plates suitable for the intended use.  
History: 1983 AACS; 2016 AACS.  
R 408.13329 Helmet and hand shield lift fronts and chin rests.  
Rule 3329. (1) The lift front of a helmet shall be fabricated from metal, plastic, or  
other suitable material. A snap hinge shall be provided so that the front part will stay up  
or down but will not remain in a partially opened position. The lift front seal against the  
helmet shall be light tight. The lift front shall be designed to accommodate a clear  
impact-resisting plate in the back or fixed part; a filter plate, impact-resisting, when  
specified; and a cover plate in the front part. The back or fixed part plate shall be clear  
heat-treated glass or plastic not more than 3/16 inch thick or less than 1/8 inch and  
capable of withstanding the impact test.  
(2) To avoid contact of a helmet or hand shield with the face of the wearer, a chin  
rest or adjustable position stop shall be provided. The chin rest and adjustable position  
stop shall be constructed of suitable rigid material and shall be detachable from the shell  
of the hand shield.  
History: 1983 AACS; 2016 AACS; 2018 AACS.  
R 408.13330 Helmet snoods, neck protectors, and aprons.  
Rule 3330.(1) A snood, or back-of-head-and-neck protector where required shall be  
of material that is flame resistant, that is a good insulator of heat and electricity, and that  
Page 17  
is capable of withstanding sanitizing. They shall be designed for easy attachment to the  
helmet, helmet headgear, or cradle.  
(2) An apron or bib, where required for a helmet, shall be of nonflammable,  
nonconducting material that is flexible and capable of withstanding sanitizing.  
History: 1983 AACS; 2016 AACS.  
R 408.13332 Effect of head protection standards.  
Rule 3332. The characteristics and performance requirements of these rules for  
welding helmets shall in no way be altered through their attachment to protective  
hats and caps, as required by R 408.13370 to R 408.13378 of this part.  
History: 1983 AACS.  
FACE SHIELDS  
R 408.13340 Purposes and uses.  
Rule 3340. (1) The devices described in R 408.13340 to R 408.13347 of this part  
are designed to provide protection to the front part of the head, including forehead,  
cheeks, nose, mouth, and chin, and to the neck, where required, from flying particles and  
sprays of hazardous liquids, and to provide filter protection where required. Such devices  
shall be worn over suitable basic eye protection devices.  
(2) Typical uses for face shields include, but are not limited to, the following  
situations:  
(a) Woodworking operations where chips and particles fly.  
(b) Metal machining causing flying particles.  
(c) Buffing, polishing, wire brushing, and grinding operations causing flying  
particles or objects.  
(d) Spot welding.  
(e) Handling of hot or corrosive materials.  
History: 1983 AACS.  
R 408.13342 Types and materials.  
Rule 3342. (1) Face shields are of 3 basic styles: headgear without crown protector;  
headgear with crown protector; and headgear with crown protector and chin protector.  
Each of these styles shall accommodate any of the following styles of windows:  
(a) Clear transparent.  
(b) Colored transparent.  
(c) Wire screen.  
(d) Combination of plastic and wire screen.  
(e) Fiber window with filter plate mounting.  
Page 18  
(2) Materials used in the manufacture of a face shield shall be non-irritating to the  
skin when subjected to perspiration and shall be capable of withstanding frequent  
sanitizing. Metals, when used, shall be resistant to corrosion. Plastic materials shall be  
slow-burning. Clear or colored plastic materials used in windows shall be of an optical  
grade. Plastic windows shall not be used in connection with welding operations unless  
they meet the requirements of table 1 of this part.  
History: 1983 AACS; 2016 AACS.  
R 408.13343 Components.  
Rule 3343. A face shield shall consist of a detachable transparent plastic  
window, wire screen window, or opaque frame with window; a tilting support, an  
adjustable headgear; and, as required, a crown protector and chin protector.  
History: 1983 AACS.  
R 408.13344 Windows.  
Rule 3344. (1) A window shall be designed to fit the contour of the window support.  
(2) A window supporting or window holding member, which shall be a band or  
crown protector, shall be attached to the headgear. The window support shall position the  
window in front of the face to provide clearance for the nose and eyeglasses of the  
wearer.  
(3) The attachment of the window to the window support shall be secure and shall  
permit easy removal and replacement. The several sizes and types of windows for a face  
shield shall be interchangeable for attachment to the window support.  
(4) A plastic or wire screen window without frame shall be not less than 9 1/2 inches  
wide at the top and 8 1/2 inches wide at the bottom, measured over its curved surfaces  
when attached and in position on the window support, and not less than 6 inches high. A  
window, when used in a frame, shall not be less than 4 inches wide and 2 inches high,  
and the frame shall conform to the dimensions specified for a window without a frame. A  
plastic window shall be not less than 0.040 inch nominal thickness.  
(5) The exposed borders of a wire screen window shall be suitably bound or  
otherwise finished to eliminate sharp, rough, or unfinished edges. A wire screen window  
shall not be less than 20-mesh screen.  
(6) A window support shall be pivotally attached to the sides of the headgear to  
permit easy tilting, either upward or downward, of the supporting member and of the  
window attached thereto. The window shall be capable of being tilted sufficiently upward  
so that the center of its bottom edge shall be out of the line of horizontal vision. The  
tension of the tilting mechanism shall be sufficient to hold the window without slippage  
in either the up or down position.  
History: 1983 AACS; 2018 AACS.  
R 408.13345 Headgear.  
Page 19  
Rule 3345. (1) A headgear shall consist of at least a headband and a crown strap. The  
headgear shall be made from materials having a low heat conductivity. The design shall  
hold the window and window support comfortably and firmly in place on the wearer's  
head and shall provide for tilting the window away from the face.  
(2) A headgear shall be readily adjustable to head sizes from 6 1/2 to 7 5/8 without  
the use of tools. The crown strap or band shall be attached to and extend between the  
front and rear centers or from the middle sides of the headband. It shall form an arc over  
the head to assist in positioning and holding the headgear in place. An adjusting device  
shall be positive and hold firmly in place after being adjusted. Its mechanisms and  
movements shall be protected so that the wearer's hair cannot catch in the device.  
(3) For greater protection, a headgear may be replaced by an impact-resistant hat or  
cap to which the window support is connected. The attachment may be either rigid or  
swiveled. If swiveled, the design shall permit lifting and adjusting the window to permit  
unobstructed vision or lowering to furnish protection.  
History: 1983 AACS; 2016 AACS.  
R 408.13346 Crown and chin protectors.  
Rule 3346. (1) A crown protector and chin protector shall be made of material having  
an impact-resistance not less than that of the plastic window. When the crown protector is  
used in conjunction with the chin protector for protection against sprays of hazardous  
liquids, the assembly of the crown protector and window support and the assembly of the  
chin protector and window shall not allow liquids to pass through any opening in the  
assembly and reach the face, forehead, or chin of the wearer.  
(2) A crown protector shall be shaped to cover at least the frontal portion of the head  
and shall extend around each side at least to a vertical line at the front of the ears. It may  
be an integral part of the window support or a separate assembly. The design shall  
provide a comfortable clearance over the forehead and the head of the wearer.  
(3) A chin protector shall be shaped to cover at least the chin and upper part of the  
neck. The design shall provide a comfortable clearance under the chin of the wearer.  
History: 1983 AACS; 2016 AACS.  
R 408.13347 Marking; special operating conditions.  
Rule 3347. (1) When a face shield is used in atmospheres or working areas requiring  
special conditions of non-conductivity or non-sparking materials used shall meet these  
requirements. A face shield shall be plainly and permanently labeled, identifying it as a  
"non-conductive face shield" or " non-sparking face shield."  
(2) A headgear and a plastic window shall bear a permanent and legible marking by  
which the manufacturer may be readily identified. A window offered for protection  
against glare shall also bear its shade designation.  
History: 1983 AACS; 2016 AACS.  
Page 20  
EYE PROTECTORS  
R 408.13350 Prescription lenses.  
Rule 3350. An employer shall assure that each affected employee who wears  
prescription lenses while engaged in operations that involve eye hazards shall wear eye  
protection which incorporates that prescription in its design or shall wear eye protection  
which can be worn over the prescription lenses without disturbing the proper position for  
the prescription lenses or the protective lenses.  
History: 1983 AACS; 1995 AACS; 1997 AACS.  
R 408.13352 Materials.  
Rule 3352. Materials used in the manufacturing of eye protectors shall combine  
mechanical strength and lightness of weight to a high degree, shall be non-irritating to the  
skin when subjected to perspiration, and shall withstand frequent sanitizing. Metals,  
where used, shall be corrosion resistant. Plastic materials, when used, shall be  
noncombustible or slow-burning. Cellulose nitrate, or materials having flammability  
characteristics approximating those of cellulose nitrate, shall not be used.  
History: 1983 AACS; 2016 AACS.  
R 408.13353 Lenses.  
Rule 3353. (1) Lenses intended for use in eye protectors are of 4 basic types, as  
follows:  
(a) Clear lenses which are impact-resisting and provide protection against flying  
objects.  
(b) Absorptive lenses of shades 1.7 through 3.0 which are impact-resisting and  
provide protection against flying objects and glare or which are impact-resisting and  
provide protection against flying objects, and narrow-band spectral transmittance of  
injurious radiation.  
(c) Protective-corrective lenses which are impact-resisting and either clear or  
absorptive, as specified for persons requiring visual correction.  
(d) Filter lenses which are impact-resisting and provide protection against flying  
objects and narrow-band spectral transmittance of injurious radiation.  
(2) Glass filter lenses intended for use in eyecup goggles shall be heat treated.  
(3) The height of the safety lens shall not be less than 30 millimeters.  
History: 1983 AACS; 2016 AACS.  
R 408.13355 Eyecup goggles; components.  
Rule 3355. Eyecup goggles shall consist of 2 eyecups with lenses and lens retainers,  
connected by an adjustable bridge, and a replaceable and adjustable headband or other  
Page 21  
means for retaining the eyecups comfortably in front of the eyes. Recommended  
applications for the use of eyecup goggles are shown in Appendix B Table 1.  
History: 1983 AACS; 2018 AACS.  
R 408.13356 Eyecup goggles; types and models.  
Rule 3356. (1) Eyecup goggles shall be of 2 types as follows:  
(a) Cup-type goggles designed to be worn by individuals who do not wear  
corrective spectacles.  
(b) Cover cup-type goggles designed to fit over corrective spectacles.  
(2) The 2 types of eyecup goggles are subdivided into the following classes:  
(a) Chipper's models providing impact protection against flying objects.  
(b) Dust and splash models providing protection against fine dust particles or  
liquid splashes and impact.  
(c) Welder's and cutter's models providing protection against glare, injurious  
radiations, and impact.  
(3) The basic designs may be modified to provide more protection against special  
hazards, but the modified equipment shall meet the same requirements as the basic  
design.  
History: 1983 AACS.  
R 408.13357 Eyecup goggles; fit.  
Rule 3357. (1) The edge of the eyecup of eyecup goggles which bears against the  
face shall have a smooth surface free from roughness or irregularities which might  
exert undue pressure or cause discomfort to the wearer. The eyecups shall be of such  
shape and size as to protect the entire eye sockets.  
(2) Cover cup-type goggles shall provide ample clearance and not interfere  
with the spectacles of the wearer. The edge of the goggles which bears against the face  
shall have a smooth surface free from roughness or irregularities which might exert  
undue pressure or cause discomfort to the wearer.  
History: 1983 AACS.  
R 408.13359 Eyecup ventilation.  
Rule 3359. (1) Eyecups of chipper's models shall be ventilated in a manner to  
permit circulation of air.  
(2) Eyecups of dust and splash models shall be ventilated in a manner to permit  
circulation of air. The ventilation openings shall be baffled or screened to prevent direct  
passage of dust or liquids into the interior of the eyecups.  
(3) Eyecups of welder's and cutter's models shall be ventilated in a manner to  
permit circulation of air and shall be opaque. The ventilation openings shall be baffled  
to prevent passage of light rays into the interior of the eyecup.  
Page 22  
History: 1983 AACS.  
R 408.13360 Eyecup lenses and retaining rings.  
Rule 3360.(1) An eyecup shall be provided with a rigidly constructed lens retaining  
ring of metal or of plastic designed to accommodate lenses and to permit their ready  
removal and replacement without damage to the eyecup or to the lenses and without the  
use of tools. The ring shall provide a complete clamping action against the lens. Lens  
retainers for welder's and cutter's models shall accommodate a filter lens, fiber gasket,  
and cover lens.  
(2) A filter lens shall be marked with the shade designation and a permanent and  
legible marking by which the manufacturer may be readily identified. A glass filter lens,  
when treated for impact-resistance, shall also be marked with the letter "H."  
History: 1983 AACS; 2016 AACS.  
R 408.13362 Flexible and cushioned fitting goggles; construction.  
Rule 3362. Flexible and cushioned fitting goggles shall consist of a wholly flexible  
frame, forming a lens holder or with a separable lens holder or a rigid frame with integral  
lens or lenses, having a separate cushioned fitting surface on the full periphery of the  
facial contact area. Materials used shall be chemical-resistant, nontoxic, non-irritating,  
and slow-burning. There shall be a positive means of support on the face, such as an  
adjustable headband of suitable material or other suitable means of support to retain the  
frame comfortably and snugly in place in front of the eyes. A frame which is a lens  
holder or has a separable lens holder shall hold the lenses firmly and tightly and be  
removable or replaceable without the use of tools. The goggles may be ventilated or not,  
as required by their intended use. Where chemical goggles are ventilated, the openings  
shall be such as to render the goggles splashproof.  
History: 1983 AACS; 2016 AACS.  
R 408.13363 Flexible and cushioned fitting goggles; protection.  
Rule 3363. (1) Chipper's models of flexible and cushioned fitting goggles shall  
provide protection against impact.  
(2) Dust and splash models shall provide protection from fine dusts, fumes,  
liquids, splashes, mists, and spray, alone or with reflected light or glare, wind, and  
impact.  
(3) Gas welder's and cutter's models shall provide protection against glare,  
injurious radiations, and impact.  
History: 1983 AACS.  
R 408.13364 Flexible and cushioned fitting goggles; marking.  
Page 23  
Rule 3364. (1) The frame of flexible and cushioned fitting goggles shall bear a  
trademark or name identifying the manufacturer.  
(2) Each separate lens shall be distinctly marked in a manner by which the  
manufacturer may be identified.  
(3) A heat-treated glass filter plate or lens shall also be marked with the shade  
designation and the letter "H."  
(4) The marking shall be clear cut and permanent and so placed as not to interfere  
with the vision of the wearer.  
History: 1983 AACS.  
R 408.13366 Foundrymen's goggles; construction.  
Rule 3366. A foundryman's goggles shall consist of a mask made of a flexible,  
non-irritating, and noncombustible or slow-burning material, such as a leather or flexible  
plastic, suitable lens holders attached thereto, lenses, and a positive means of support on  
the face, such as an adjustable headband, to retain the mask comfortably and snugly in  
place in front of the eyes. The edge of the mask on contact with the face shall be provided  
with a binding of corduroy or other suitable material. The lens holders shall hold the  
lenses firmly and tightly and may be readily removable or replaceable. The lens holders  
shall be ventilated to permit circulation of air.  
History: 1983 AACS; 2016 AACS.  
R 408.13367 Foundrymen's goggles; protection.  
Rule 3367. (1) A foundryman's goggles shall provide protection against impact and  
hot-metal splash hazards encountered in foundry operations such as melting, pouring,  
chipping, babbitting, grinding, and riveting. Where required, the foundryman’s goggles  
shall also provide protection against dusts.  
(2) Applications for use of foundrymen's goggles are shown in R 408.13312a Table  
1.  
(3) Materials shall resist flame, corrosion, water, and sanitizing.  
History: 1983 AACS; 2018 AACS.  
SPECTACLES  
R 408.13369. Spectacles.  
Rule 3369. (1) Spectacles, also known as safety glasses, of metal, plastic, or a  
combination thereof, shall consist of lenses in a frame that supports the lenses around  
their entire periphery of suitable size and shape for the purpose intended connected by a  
nose bridge, and retained on the face by temples or other suitable means.  
(2) The spectacles, also known as safety glasses, shall be furnished with or without  
sideshields depending upon their intended use.  
Page 24  
(3) The frames, temples, and sideshields may be metal or plastic, and when made of  
plastic, shall be of the slow-burning type.  
(4) Spectacles, also known as safety glasses, shall provide protection to the eye from  
flying objects, and, when required, from glare and injurious radiations.  
(5) Spectacles, also known as safety glasses, without sideshields are intended to provide  
frontal protection.  
(6) Where side as well as frontal protection is required, the spectacles, also known as  
safety glasses, shall be provided with sideshields.  
Note: Appendix B, Appendix Table 1 “Eye and Face Protector Selection Chart,” and  
Appendix Figure 1, “Eye and Face Protective Devices Chart,” shall be used as a guide in  
the selection of the proper eye and face protection.  
(7) Frames shall be designed for industrial exposure and shall bear a trademark  
identifying the manufacturer on both fronts and temples. The frame front shall carry a  
designation of the eye size and bridge size, where applicable. Temples shall be marked as  
to the overall length or fitting value.  
(8) Temples may be of the cable or spatula type, as specified, and shall be of such  
design as to permit adjustment and fit comfortably and securely on the wearer. The size  
of the temples shall be clearly marked.  
(9) Safety lens in frames which do not comply with this part shall not be worn.  
History: 1983 AACS; 2014 AACS.  
HEAD PROTECTION EQUIPMENT  
R 408.13370. Use of head protection.  
Rule 3370. (1) An employer shall ensure that each affected employee is provided with,  
and wears, head protection equipment and accessories when the employee is required to  
be present in areas where a hazard exists from any of the following:  
(a) Falling or flying objects.  
(b) Other harmful contacts or exposures.  
(c) Where there is a risk of injury from any of the following:  
(i) Electric shock.  
(ii) Hair entanglement.  
(iii) Chemicals.  
(iv) Temperature extremes.  
(2) Service facilities shall be provided for the sanitizing and replacement of needed parts  
when necessary and before head protection equipment is re-issued.  
(3) Head protection equipment that has been physically altered or damaged shall not be  
worn or reissued to an employee.  
(4) An employee shall not physically alter, and shall guard against damage to, the head  
protection equipment provided.  
(5) An employee shall use the provided head protection equipment in accordance  
with the instructions and training received.  
History: 1983 AACS; 1995 AACS; 1997 AACS; 2014 AACS.  
Page 25  
Editor's Note: An obvious error in R 408.13370 was corrected at the request of the promulgating  
agency, pursuant to Section 56 of 1969 PA 306, as amended by 2000 PA 262, MCL 24.256. The rule  
containing the error was published in Michigan Register, 2014 MR 7. The memorandum requesting the  
correction was published in Michigan Register, 2014 MR 13.  
R 408.13372. Criteria for head protection.  
Rule 3372. (1) An employer shall provide each employee with head protection that  
meets the specifications contained in any of the following consensus standards:  
(a) ANSI Z-89.1 "American National Standard for Industrial Head Protection," 2009  
edition, as adopted in R 408.13301a.  
(b) ANSI Z-89.1, "American National Standard for Industrial Head Protection,”  
2003 edition, as adopted in R 408.13301a.  
(c) ANSI Z-89.1 "American National Standard for Personnel Protection—Protective  
Headwear for Industrial Workers--Requirements," 1997 edition, as adopted in  
R 408.13301a.  
(2) Any head protection device that the employer demonstrates is at least as  
effective as a head protection device constructed in accordance with 1 of the consensus  
standards adopted in subrule (1) of this rule is considered to be in compliance with this  
rule.  
History: 1983 AACS; 1995 AACS; 1997 AACS; 2014 AACS.  
R 408.13375. Protective helmets.  
Rule 3375. (1) Protective helmets shall be described by impact type and electrical  
class. All protective helmets shall meet either Type I or Type II requirements. All helmets  
shall be further classified as meeting Class G, Class E, or Class C electrical requirements.  
Helmets shall be classified as follows:  
(a) Impact type protective helmets shall be either of the following:  
(i) Type I helmets intended to reduce the force of impact resulting from a blow only  
to the top of the head.  
(ii) Type II helmets intended to reduce the force of impact resulting from a blow to  
the top or sides of the head.  
(b) Electrical classes for protective helmets shall be 1 of the following:  
(i) Class G, general protective helmets are intended to reduce the danger of contact  
with low voltage conductors. Test samples shall be proof-tested at 2200 volts (phase to  
ground). This voltage is not intended as an indication of the voltage at which the helmets  
protects the wearer.  
(ii) Class E, electrical protective helmets are intended to reduce the danger of  
contact with higher voltage conductors. Test samples shall be proof-tested at 20,000 volts  
(phase to ground). This voltage is not intended as an indication of the voltage at which  
the helmet protects the wearer.  
(iii) Class C, conductive protective helmets are not intended to provide protection  
against contact with electrical hazards.  
Page 26  
(2) A metallic head device shall not be furnished by an employer or used by an  
employee for head protection, except where it has been determined that the use of other  
types of protective helmets or safety hats or caps is impractical, such as where chemical  
reaction will cause the deterioration of other types of head protection.  
(3) A protective helmet furnished by an employer shall be identified on the inside of  
the shell with the name of the manufacturer.  
(4) When used in conjunction with protective helmets, faceshields, welding helmets,  
and goggles shall be in compliance with the requirements in these rules, and hearing  
protection shall be in compliance with Occupational Health Standard Part 380  
“Occupational Noise Exposure,” as referenced in R 408.13301a.  
(5) Winter liners and chin straps used in conjunction with class E helmets for  
high-voltage protection shall not contain any metallic parts or other conductive materials.  
(6) Winter liners and chin straps used in areas where there is a danger of ignition  
from heat, flame, or chemical reaction shall be made of materials that are non-burning or  
flame retardant.  
(7) Bump hats or caps or other limited-protection devices shall not be used as a  
substitute for protective helmets for the hazards described in R 408.13370.  
(8) An employer shall ensure that protective helmets designed to reduce electrical  
shock hazard shall be worn by each affected employee who is near exposed electrical  
conductors that could come in contact with the employee’s head.  
History: 1983 AACS; 1995 AACS; 2014 AACS; 2016 AACS.  
R 408.13376. Hoods.  
Rule 3376. (1) A hood shall be made of materials that combine all of the following:  
(a) Have mechanical strength and lightness of weight to a high degree.  
(b) Be non-irritating to the skin when subjected to perspiration.  
(c) Be capable of withstanding frequent cleaning and disinfection.  
(2) Materials used in the manufacture of hoods shall also be suitable to withstand the  
hazards to which the user may be exposed.  
(3) A hood shall bear a permanent and legible marking by which the manufacturer may  
be readily identified.  
(4) A hood shall be designed to provide adequate ventilation for the wearer.  
(5) A protective helmet shall be used in conjunction with a hood where there is a head  
injury hazard and the hood shall be designed to accommodate such helmet.  
History: 1983 AACS; 2014 AACS.  
R 408.13378. Hair enclosures; face and head.  
Rule 3378. (1) A hat, cap, or net shall be worn by a person where there is a danger of hair  
entanglement in moving machinery or equipment, or where there is exposure to means of  
ignition.  
(2) Hair enclosures include all of the following:  
(a) Be designed to be reasonably comfortable to the wearer.  
(b) Completely enclose all loose hair.  
Page 27  
(c) Be adjustable to accommodate all head sizes.  
(3) Be material used for hair enclosures of all of the following:  
(a) Fast dyed.  
(b) Non-irritating to the skin when subjected to perspiration.  
(c) Capable of withstanding frequent cleaning.  
(4) Hair enclosures shall not be reissued from 1 employee to another unless it has been  
thoroughly sanitized.  
History: 1983 AACS; 2014 AACS.  
FOOT AND TOE PROTECTION  
R 408.13383. Criteria for protective footwear.  
Rule 3383. (1) Protective footwear shall comply with any of the following  
consensus standards:  
(a) ASTM F-2412 “Standard Test Methods for Foot Protection,” 2005 edition, as  
adopted in R 408.13301a.  
(b) ASTM F-2413 “Standard Specification for Performance Requirements for  
Protective Footwear,” 2005 edition, as adopted in R 408.13301a.  
(c) ANSI Z-41 "American National Standard for Personal Protection -- Protective  
Footwear," 1999 edition, as adopted in R 408.13301a.  
(2) Protective footwear that an employer demonstrates is at least as effective as  
protective footwear that is constructed in accordance with 1 of the consensus standards  
adopted in subrule (1) of this rule, shall be considered to be in compliance with the  
requirements of this rule.  
History: 1983 AACS; 1995 AACS; 1997 AACS; 2014 AACS.  
Editor's Note: An obvious error in R 408.13383 was corrected at the request of the promulgating  
agency, pursuant to Section 56 of 1969 PA 306, as amended by 2000 PA 262, MCL 24.256. The rule  
containing the error was published in Michigan Register, 2014 MR 7. The memorandum requesting the  
correction was published in Michigan Register, 2014 MR 13.  
R 408.13384 Toe protection.  
Rule 3384. Where toe protection other than safety toe footwear is worn, the toe  
protection shall have an impact value of not less than that required for the safety toe  
footwear.  
History: 1983 AACS.  
R 408.13385. Use of foot protection.  
Rule 3385. (1) An employer shall ensure that each affected employee shall wear  
protective footwear when working in areas where any of the following occur:  
Page 28  
(a) When the use of protective footwear will protect the affected employee from an  
electrical hazard, such as a static-discharge or electric-shock hazard, that remains after  
the employer takes other necessary protective measures.  
(b) There is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects.  
(c) There is a danger of objects piercing the sole of the shoe.  
(2) An employer shall ensure that safety shoes and boots that are not worn over  
shoes and that are worn by more than 1 employee are maintained, cleaned, and sanitized  
inside and out before being issued to another employee.  
History: 1983 AACS; 1995 AACS; 1997 AACS; 2014 AACS; 2015 AACS.  
R 408.13386. Foot protection; requirements.  
Rule 3386. If a hazard is created from a process, environment, chemical, or  
mechanical irritant which could cause an injury or impairment to the feet by absorption or  
physical contact, other than from impact, then the employer shall provide any of the  
following to the employee:  
(a) Boots.  
(b) Overshoes.  
(c) Rubbers.  
(d) Wooden-soled shoes.  
(e) The equivalent to subdivisions (a) to (d) of this subrule.  
History: 1983 AACS; 2014 AACS.  
ELECTRICAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT  
R 408.13387 Design requirements for specific types of electrical protective  
equipment.  
Rule 3387. (1) Rubber insulating blankets, rubber insulating matting, rubber  
insulating covers, rubber insulating line hose, rubber insulating gloves, and rubber  
insulating sleeves shall meet the following requirements:  
(a) Blankets, gloves, and sleeves shall be produced by a seamless process.  
(b) Each item shall be clearly marked as follows:  
(i) Class 00 equipment shall be marked class 00.  
(ii) Class 0 equipment shall be marked class 0.  
(iii) Class 1 equipment shall be marked class 1.  
(iv) Class 2 equipment shall be marked class 2.  
(v) Class 3 equipment shall be marked class 3.  
(vi) Class 4 equipment shall be marked class 4.  
(vii) Non-ozone-resistant equipment shall be marked type I.  
(viii) Ozone-resistant equipment shall be marked type II.  
(ix) Other relevant markings, such as the manufacturer’s identification and the size  
of the equipment, may also be provided.  
Page 29  
(c) Markings shall be non-conducting and shall be applied in such a manner as not to  
impair the insulating qualities of the equipment.  
(d) Markings on gloves shall be confined to the cuff portion of the glove.  
(2) Electrical requirements shall be all of the following:  
(a) Equipment shall be capable of withstanding the alternating current proof-test  
voltage specified in Table A or the direct current proof-test voltage specified in Table B.  
All of the following apply:  
(i) The proof test shall reliably indicate that the equipment can withstand the voltage  
involved.  
(ii) The test voltage shall be applied continuously for 3 minutes for equipment other  
than matting and shall be applied continuously for 1 minute for matting.  
(iii) Gloves shall be capable of separately withstanding the alternating current  
proof-test voltage specified in Table A after a 16-hour water soak.  
(b) When the alternating current proof test is used on gloves, the 60-hertz proof-test  
current shall not exceed the values specified in Table A at any time during the test period.  
All of the following apply:  
(i) If the alternating current proof test is made at a frequency other than 60 hertz, the  
permissible proof-test current shall be computed from the direct ratio of the frequencies.  
(ii) For the test, gloves(right side out) shall be filled with tap water and immersed in  
water to a depth that is in accordance with Table C. Water shall be added to or removed  
from the glove, as necessary, so that the water level is the same inside and outside the  
glove.  
(iii) After the 16-hour water soak specified in this subrule, the 60-hertz proof-test  
current shall not exceed the values given in Table A by more than 2 milliamperes.  
(c) Equipment that has been subjected to a minimum breakdown voltage test shall  
not be used for electrical protection. See subrule (3) of this rule.  
(d) Material used for Type II insulating equipment shall be capable of withstanding  
an ozone test, with no visible effects. The ozone test shall reliably indicate that the  
material will resist ozone exposure in actual use. Any visible signs of ozone deterioration  
of the material, such as checking, cracking, breaks, or pitting, is evidence of failure to  
meet the requirements for ozone-resistant material. See subrule (3) of this rule.  
(3) Workmanship and finish shall comply with both of the following:  
(a) Equipment shall be free of physical irregularities that can adversely affect the  
insulating properties of the equipment and that can be detected by the tests or inspections  
required by these rules.  
(b) Surface irregularities that may be present on all rubber goods, because of  
imperfections on forms or molds or because of inherent difficulties in the manufacturing  
process, and that may appear as indentations, protuberances, or imbedded foreign  
material are acceptable under the following conditions:  
(i) The indentation or protuberance blends into a smooth slope when the material is  
stretched.  
(ii) Foreign material remains in place when the insulating material is folded and  
stretches with the insulating material surrounding it.  
(4) Rubber insulating equipment meeting the national consensus standards in Table  
4 is considered to be in compliance with the performance requirements of these rules.  
Page 30  
TABLE 2  
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF TESTING MATERIALS STANDARDS  
ASTM  
NUMBER  
SUPPLEME  
STANDARD TITLE  
EDITION  
2009  
NT  
Standard Specification for Rubber  
Insulating Gloves  
D-120  
-
Standard Specification for Rubber  
Insulating Matting  
D-178  
2001  
2010  
-
Standard Specification for Rubber  
Insulating Blankets  
D-1048  
D-1049  
D-1050  
D-1051  
2012  
Standard Specification for Rubber  
Insulating Covers  
1998  
2010  
2011  
-
Standard Specification for Rubber  
Insulating Line Hose  
2005  
Standard Specification for Rubber  
Insulating Sleeves  
2008  
These standards contain specifications for conducting the various tests required in these  
rules. For example, the alternating current and direct current proof tests, the breakdown test,  
the water-soak procedure, and the ozone test described in this rule are described in detail in  
these ASTM standards.  
ASTM F-1236 “Standard Guide for Visual Inspection of Electrical Protective Rubber  
Products,” 1996 Edition with 2012 supplement, as adopted in R 408.13301a, presents methods  
and techniques for the visual inspection of electrical protective equipment made of rubber.  
This guide also contains descriptions and photographs of irregularities that can be found in this  
equipment  
ASTM F-819 “Standard Terminology Relating to Electrical Protective Equipment for  
Workers,” 2010 edition, as adopted in R 408.13301a, includes definitions of terms relating to  
the electrical protective equipment covered in these rules.  
History: 1983 AACS; 1995 AACS; 1997 AACS; 2014 AACS; 2015 AACS; 2016 AACS; 2018  
AACS.  
R 408.13387a. Electrical protective equipment.  
Rule 3387a. (1) Material other than rubber that offers protection equivalent to or  
greater than rubber may be used if the material is certified to meet the appropriate ASTM  
standard tests.  
(2) An insulated blanket, glove, or sleeve shall be capable of withstanding the  
voltage to which it may be subjected.  
Page 31  
(3) Exposed conductors or equipment, or both, except for conductors or equipment  
being directly worked on, that is energized from 750 volts to 28,000 volts phase to  
ground and that an employee may reach into or touch shall be isolated or covered with at  
least 1 of the following:  
(a) An insulating blanket.  
(b) An insulating hood.  
(c) An insulating line hose.  
(d) An insulating barrier.  
(4) An employee shall use insulating gloves and sleeves capable of withstanding the  
imposed voltage when performing any of the following activities:  
(a) Working directly on, or within reaching distance of, a conductor or equipment at  
a nominal 750 volts or more phase to ground, except when using barehanded techniques  
or a hot stick. Sleeves are not required for an employee who performs routine switching  
operations in a substation or powerhouse. An employee who uses gloves and sleeves and  
works directly on or within reaching distance of a conductor or equipment energized at  
more than 5,000 volts phase to ground shall do so from an insulated platform or board or  
an aerial device that has an insulated basket.  
(b) Connecting or disconnecting primary neutrals, pole ground wires, or other  
conductors normally connected to static wires or energized equipment, except that gloves  
and sleeves shall not be worn while connecting and disconnecting a service neutral or  
secondary neutral.  
(c) Working on a de-energized conductor that extends into an area in which contact  
may be made with an energized conductor or exposed parts of energized equipment,  
unless the conductor is grounded or isolated. Insulating sleeves are optional at voltages of  
less than 750 volts phase to ground.  
(5) An employee shall use insulating gloves capable of withstanding the imposed  
voltage when performing either of the following activities:  
(a) When working with a powered or manual hole digger while using booms or  
using winch lines to install or remove poles or equipment where the hole digger may  
contact conductors or equipment energized at a voltage of 300 volts or more phase to  
ground. An employee shall not use the gloves while in the enclosed cab of the equipment.  
(b) When working directly on a conductor or equipment energized at a voltage of  
more than 240 volts phase to ground. This does not include the use of test equipment.  
History: 2014 AACS; 2015 AACS.  
R 408.13388 Design requirements for other types of electrical protective  
equipment.  
Rule 3388. (1) The following requirements apply to the design and manufacture of  
electrical protective equipment that is not covered by R 408.40650:  
(2) Insulating equipment used for the protection of employees shall be capable of  
withstanding, without failure, the voltages that may be imposed upon it.  
Note 1 to subrule (2): These voltages include transient over-voltages, such as  
switching surges, as well as nominal line voltage. See General Industry Safety Standard  
Part 86 “Electric Power Generation, Transmission, and Distribution,” Appendix B, as  
Page 32  
referenced in R 408.13301a, for a discussion of transient over-voltages on electric power  
transmission and distribution systems.  
Note 2 to subrule (2): See IEEE 516 “Guide for Maintenance Methods on Energized  
Power Lines,” 2009 edition, as adopted in R 408.13301a, for methods of determining the  
magnitude of transient over-voltages on an electrical system and for a discussion  
comparing the ability of insulation equipment to withstand a transient overvoltage based  
on its ability to withstand alternating current voltage testing.  
(3) Equipment current shall comply with both of the following:  
(a) Protective equipment used for the primary insulation of employees from  
energized circuit parts shall be capable of passing a current test when subjected to the  
highest nominal voltage on which the equipment is to be used.  
(b) When insulating equipment is tested pursuant to these rules, the equipment  
current may not exceed 1 microampere per kilovolt of phase-to-phase applied voltage.  
Note 1 to subrule (3): This rule shall apply to equipment that provides primary  
insulation of employees from energized parts. It does not apply to equipment used for  
secondary insulation or equipment used for brush contact only.  
Note 2 to subrule (3): For alternating current excitation, this current consists of the  
following three components:  
(a) Capacitive current because of the dielectric properties of the insulating material  
itself.  
(b) Conduction current through the volume of the insulating equipment.  
(c) Leakage current along the surface of the tool or equipment.  
The conduction current shall be normally negligible. For clean, dry insulating  
equipment, the leakage current shall be small, and the capacitive current shall  
predominate.  
Note 3 to subrule (3): Plastic guard equipment is considered to conform to the  
performance requirements of this rule, if it meets, and is used in accordance with ASTM  
F-712 “Standard Test Methods and Specifications for Electrically Insulating Plastic  
Guard Equipment for Protection of Workers,” 2006 edition with 2011 supplement, as  
adopted in R 408.13301a.  
History: 2015 AACS.  
R 408.13389 In-service care and use of electrical protective equipment.  
Rule 3389. (1) Electrical protective equipment shall be maintained in a safe, reliable  
condition.  
(2) The following specific requirements apply to rubber insulating blankets, rubber  
insulating covers, rubber insulating line hose, rubber insulating gloves, and rubber  
insulating sleeves.  
(3) Maximum use voltages shall conform to those listed in Table D.  
(4) An employer shall ensure that insulating equipment is inspected for damage  
before each day’s use and immediately following any incident that can reasonably be  
suspected of causing damage. Insulating gloves shall be given an air test, along with the  
inspection.  
Note to subrule (4): ASTM F-1236 “Standard Guide for Visual Inspection of  
Electrical Protective Rubber Products,” 1996 Edition with 2012 supplement, as adopted  
Page 33  
in R 408.13301a, presents methods and techniques for the visual inspection of electrical  
protective equipment made of rubber. This guide also contains descriptions and  
photographs of irregularities that can be found in this equipment.  
(5) Insulating equipment with any of the following defects shall not be used.  
(a) A hole, tear, puncture, or cut.  
(b) Ozone cutting or ozone checking, that is, a series of interlacing cracks produced  
by ozone on rubber under mechanical stress.  
(c) An embedded foreign object.  
(d) Any of the following texture changes:  
(i) Swelling.  
(ii) Softening.  
(iii) Hardening.  
(iv) Becoming sticky or inelastic.  
(v) Any other defect that damages the insulating properties.  
(6) An employer shall ensure that insulating equipment found to have other defects  
that might affect its insulating properties is removed from service and returned for testing  
under subrules (10) and (11) of this rule.  
(7) An employer shall ensure that insulating equipment is cleaned as needed to  
remove foreign substances.  
(8) Insulating equipment shall be stored in a location and in a manner as to protect it  
from all of the following:  
(a) Light.  
(b) Temperature extremes.  
(c) Excessive humidity.  
(d) Ozone.  
(e) Other damaging substances and conditions.  
(9) Protector gloves shall be worn over insulating gloves, except under the following  
conditions:  
(a) Protector gloves need not be used with class 0 gloves, under limited-use  
conditions, when small equipment and parts manipulation necessitate unusually high  
finger dexterity.  
Note to subrule (9)(a): Persons inspecting rubber insulating gloves used under these  
conditions shall take extra care in visually examining them. Employees using rubber  
insulating gloves under these conditions shall take extra care to avoid handling sharp  
objects.  
(b) If the voltage does not exceed 250 volts, ac, or 375 volts, direct current, protector  
gloves shall not be used with class 00 gloves, under limited-use conditions, when small  
equipment and parts manipulation necessitate unusually high finger dexterity.  
Note to subrule (9)(b): Persons inspecting rubber insulating gloves used under these  
conditions shall take extra care in visually examining them. Employees using rubber  
insulating gloves under these conditions shall take extra care to avoid handling sharp  
objects.  
(c) Any other class of glove may be used without protector gloves, under limited-use  
conditions, when small equipment and parts manipulation necessitate unusually high  
finger dexterity but only if the employer can demonstrate that the possibility of physical  
Page 34  
damage to the gloves is small and if the class of glove is 1 class higher than that required  
for the voltage involved.  
(d) Insulating gloves that have been used without protector gloves may not be reused  
until they have been tested under the provisions of this rule.  
(10) Electrical protective equipment shall be subjected to periodic electrical tests.  
Test voltages and the maximum intervals between tests shall be pursuant to Table D and  
Table E.  
(11) The test method used in this rule shall reliably indicate whether the insulating  
equipment can withstand the voltages involved.  
Note to subrule (11): The standard electrical test methods considered as meeting this  
requirement are listed in Table 3.  
(12) Insulating equipment failing to pass inspections or electrical tests shall not be  
used by employees, except as follows:  
(a) Rubber insulating line hose may be used in shorter lengths with the defective  
portion cut off.  
(b) Rubber insulating blankets may be salvaged by severing the defective area from  
the undamaged portion of the blanket. The resulting undamaged area shall not be smaller  
than 560 millimeters by 560 millimeters (22 inches by 22 inches) for class 1, 2, 3, and 4  
blankets.  
(c) Rubber insulating blankets shall be repaired using a compatible patch that results  
in physical and electrical properties equal to those of the blanket.  
(d) Rubber insulating gloves and sleeves with minor physical defects, such as small  
cuts, tears, or punctures, shall be repaired by the application of a compatible patch. Also,  
rubber insulating gloves and sleeves with minor surface blemishes shall be repaired with  
a compatible liquid compound. The repaired area shall have electrical and physical  
properties equal to those of the surrounding material. Repairs to gloves shall be permitted  
only in the area between the wrist and the reinforced edge of the opening.  
(13) An employer shall ensure that repaired insulating equipment is retested before it  
is used by employees.  
(14) The employer shall certify that equipment has been tested pursuant to the  
requirements of this rule. The certification shall identify the equipment that passed the  
test and the date it was tested and shall be made available upon request to the department  
of licensing and regulatory affairs director and to MIOSHA employees or their authorized  
representatives.  
Note to subrule (14): Marking equipment with, and entering onto logs, the results of  
the tests and the dates of testing are acceptable means of meeting the certification  
requirement.  
TABLE 3  
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF TESTING MATERIALS STANDARDS  
ASTM  
NUMBER  
EDITIO  
SUPPLEM  
ENT  
STANDARD TITLE  
N
Page 35  
Standard Specification for Rubber  
Insulating Gloves  
D-120  
2009  
2001  
2012  
1998  
2005  
2008  
-
Standard Specification for Rubber  
Insulating Matting  
D-178  
2010  
Standard Specification for Rubber  
Insulating Blankets  
D-1048  
D-1049  
D-1050  
D-1051  
Standard Specification for Rubber  
Insulating Covers  
2010  
2011  
-
Standard Specification for Rubber  
Insulating Line Hose  
Standard Specification for Rubber  
Insulating Sleeves  
Standard Specification for  
In-Service Care of Insulating  
Line Hose and Covers  
F-478  
F-479  
F-496  
2009  
2006  
2008  
-
Standard  
In-Service Care of Insulating Blankets  
Standard Specification for  
Specification  
for  
2011  
-
In-Service Care of Insulating Gloves  
And Sleeves  
TABLE A  
ALTERNATING CURRENT PROOF-TEST REQUIREMENTS  
Maximum Proof-Test Current, mA  
(Globes Only)  
PROOF-TE  
VOLTAGE  
280-m  
CLASS OF ST  
EQUIPMENT  
360-m  
410-m  
460-m  
(18  
m
m
m
m
(11  
RMS V  
(14  
(16  
in.)  
in.) Glove in.) Glove in.) Glove  
Glove  
8
00  
0
2,500  
12  
12  
14  
16  
-
-
5,000  
8
-
14  
16  
18  
16  
18  
20  
1
10,000  
20,000  
2
-
Page 36  
3
4
30,000  
40,000  
-
-
18  
-
20  
22  
22  
24  
TABLE B  
DIRECT CURRENT PROOF-TEST REQUIREMENTS  
CLASS OF EQUIPMENT  
PROOF-TEST VOLTAGE  
00  
0
10,000  
20,000  
40,000  
50,000  
60,000  
70,000  
1
2
3
4
NOTE: The dc voltages listed in this table are not appropriate for proof testing  
rubber insulating line hose or covers. For this equipment, dc proof tests shall use a  
voltage high enough to indicate that the equipment can be safely used at the voltages  
listed in Table D.