DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY  
WATER BUREAU  
WATER RESOURCES PROTECTION  
(By authority conferred on the department of environmental quality by sections 3103 and  
3106 of 1994 PA 451, MCL 324.3103 and 324.3106  
PART 8. WATER QUALITY-BASED EFFLUENT LIMIT DEVELOPMENT FOR  
TOXIC SUBSTANCES  
R 323.1201 Purpose.  
Rule 1201. The rules in this part shall be used to establish toxic substance water quality-  
based effluent limits (WQBELs) for point source discharges that are protective of the  
designated uses of the surface waters of the state as established in R 323.1100. WQBELs for  
certain toxic substances may be very low and in some cases less than what current analytical  
techniques can detect or quantify. In some effluents, the low levels may not be amenable to  
regulatory control through end-of-pipe treatment technology in a cost-effective manner. To  
achieve compliance with the low WQBELs and associated regulatory requirements, the  
department is committed to, and strongly encourages, the use of pollution prevention, source  
control, and other waste minimization programs. End-of-pipe treatment for the low WQBELs  
which is extraordinary or beyond that which would be necessary if not for the low WQBELs  
will not be required by the department unless it is determined to be the most cost-effective means  
or the only means to achieve the applicable water quality-based effluent limit. The provisions of R  
323.1103 may provide an alternative to extraordinary end- of-pipe treatment where such treatment  
would result in unreasonable economic effects on the discharger. The rules of this part shall not  
be used as a basis for establishing controls on the discharge of toxic substances from  
intermittent wet-weather point sources.  
History: 1997 AACS.  
R 323.1203 Definitions; A to L.  
Rule 1203. As used in this part:  
(a) "Acute-chronic ratio (ACR)" means a standard measure of the acute toxicity of a  
material divided by an appropriate measure of the chronic toxicity of the same material under  
comparable conditions.  
(b) "Acute toxicity" means an adverse effect that results from an acute exposure which  
occurs within any short observation period and which usually does not constitute a substantial  
portion of the life span of the organism.  
(c) "Acute toxic unit (TUa)" means 100/LC50 where the LC50 is determined from a whole  
effluent toxicity (WET) test which produces a result that is statistically or graphically estimated  
to be lethal to 50% of the test organisms.  
(d) "Aquatic life value" means a tier I or tier II value developed under R 323.1057(2).  
Page 1  
(e) "Bioaccumulation equivalency factor (BEF)" means the bioaccumulation potential for  
the toxicologically important chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and chlorinated dibenzo-p-furans  
relative to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD) for use in calculating 2,3,7,8-  
TCDD toxicity equivalency concentrations in water as the 2,3,7,8-TCDD toxicity  
equivalency concentrations relate to deriving human health water quality values.  
(f) "Bioaccumulation factor (BAF)" means the ratio, in liters per kilogram, of a  
substance's concentration in tissue of an aquatic organism to its concentration in the ambient water  
where both the organism and its food are exposed and the ratio does not change substantially over  
time.  
(g) "Bioaccumulative chemical of concern (BCC)" means a chemical which, upon entering  
the surface waters, by itself or as its toxic transformation product, accumulates in aquatic  
organisms by a human health bioaccumulation factor (BAF) of more than 1000 derived after  
considering metabolism and other physiochemical properties that might enhance or inhibit  
bioaccumulation. The human health bioaccumulation factor shall be derived according to R  
323.1057(5). Chemicals with half-lives of less than 8 weeks in the water column, sediment, and  
biota are not BCCs. The minimum BAF information needed to define an organic chemical as a  
BCC is either a field-measured BAF or a BAF derived using the biota-sediment accumulation  
factor (BSAF) methodology. The minimum BAF information needed to define an inorganic  
chemical as a BCC, including an organometal, is either a field-measured BAF or a  
laboratory-measured bioconcentration factor (BCF). The BCCs to which these rules apply are  
identified in table 5 of R 323.1057.  
(h) "Bioconcentration factor (BCF)" means the ratio, in liters per kilogram, of a  
substance's concentration in tissue of an aquatic organism to its concentration in the ambient water  
in situations where the organism is exposed through the water only and the ratio does not  
change substantially over time.  
(i) "Biota-sediment accumulation factor (BSAF)" means the ratio, in kilograms of  
organic carbon per kilogram of lipid, of a substance's lipid-normalized concentration in tissue  
of an aquatic organism to its organic carbon-normalized concentration in surface sediment in  
situations where the ratio does not change substantially over time, both the organism and its food  
are exposed, and the surface sediment is representative of average surface sediment in the  
vicinity of the organism.  
(j) "Carcinogen" means a substance which causes an increased incidence of benign or  
malignant neoplasms in animals or humans or that substantially decreases the time in which  
neoplasms develop in animals or humans.  
(k) "Chemical-specific water quality-based effluent limit" means water quality-based  
effluent limits that are based on an individual chemical.  
(l) "Chronic toxicity" means a concurrent and delayed adverse effect that occurs only as a  
result of a chronic exposure.  
(m) "Chronic toxic unit (TUc)" means 100/MATC or 100/IC25, where the maximum  
acceptable toxicant concentration (MATC) and IC25 are expressed as a percent effluent in the test  
medium.  
(n) "Clean water act" means the federal water pollution control act codified at 33 U.S.C.  
§1251 et seq., as amended.  
(o) "Daily maximum water quality-based effluent limit" means an effluent specific water  
quality-based effluent limit in an NPDES permit developed to protect aquatic life from acute  
chemical specific or whole effluent toxicity.  
Page 2  
(p) "Department" means the director of the Michigan department of environmental  
quality, or his or her designee to whom the director delegates a power or duty by written  
instrument.  
(q) "Detection level" means the lowest concentration or amount of the target analyte that  
can be determined to be different from zero by a single measurement at a stated level of  
probability.  
(r) "Discharge-induced mixing" means the mixing of a discharge and receiving water  
that occurs due to discharge momentum and buoyancy up to the point where mixing is controlled  
by ambient turbulence.  
(s) "Dissolved metal" means the concentration of a metal that will pass through a 0.45-mm  
membrane filter.  
(t) "Existing discharge" means any building, structure, facility, or installation from which  
there is or may be a discharge of toxic substances to the surface waters of the state that is not a new  
discharge.  
(u) "Final acute value (FAV)" means the level of a chemical or mixture of chemicals that  
does not allow the mortality or other specified response of aquatic organisms to exceed 50%  
when exposed for 96 hours, except where a shorter time period is appropriate for certain species.  
The FAV shall be calculated under R 323.1057(2) if appropriate for the chemical.  
(v) "Human cancer value (HCV)" means the maximum ambient water concentration  
of a substance at which a lifetime of exposure from either drinking the water, consuming fish  
from the water, and conducting water-related recreation activities or consuming fish from the  
water and conducting water-related recreation activities will represent a plausible upper bound  
risk of contracting cancer of 1 in 100,000 using the exposure assumptions and methodology  
specified in R 323.1057(4).  
(w) "Human noncancer value (HNV)" means the maximum ambient water concentration  
of a substance at which adverse noncancer effects are not likely to occur in the human population  
from lifetime exposure through either drinking the water, consuming fish from the water,  
and conducting water-related recreation activities or consuming fish from the water and  
conducting water-related recreation activities using the exposure assumption and methodology in  
R 323.1057(4).  
(x) "Intake toxic substance" means the amount of a toxic substance that is present in surface  
or groundwaters of the state at the time the toxic substance is withdrawn from the waters by  
the discharger or present in the water provided to the discharger by another facility.  
(y) "Intermittent wet-weather point source" means a point source discharge that occurs as a  
result of a rainfall or snowmelt event. An intermittent wet-weather point source includes a  
treated or untreated combined sewer overflow, but does not include a storm water discharge that  
is mixed with other industrial or commercial wastewater or an increased discharge from a  
municipal wastewater treatment plant due to a rainfall or snowmelt event.  
(z) "IC25" means the toxicant concentration that would cause a 25% reduction in a  
nonquantal biological measurement for the test population.  
(aa) "LC50" means a statistically or graphically estimated concentration that is expected to  
be lethal to 50% of a group of organisms under specified conditions.  
(bb) "Load allocation" means the portion of a receiving water's loading capacity that is  
attributed to existing or future nonpoint sources, including natural background sources.  
(cc) "Loading capacity" means the greatest amount of pollutant loading that a water can  
receive without violating water quality standards.  
(dd) "Lotic" means surface waters of the state that exhibit flow.  
Page 3  
History: 1997 AACS; 2006 AACS.  
R 323.1205 Definitions; M to Z.  
Rule 1205. As used in this part:  
(a) "Mass load" means a wasteload allocation specified in units of weight per time.  
(b) "Maximum acceptable toxicant concentration (MATC)" means the concentration  
obtained by calculating the geometric mean of the lower and upper chronic limits from a chronic  
test. A lower chronic limit is the highest tested concentration that did not cause the occurrence  
of a specific adverse effect. An upper chronic limit is the lowest tested concentration which did  
cause the occurrence of a specific adverse effect and above which all tested concentrations caused  
such an occurrence.  
(c) "Minimum level" means the level at which the entire analytical system must give a  
recognizable signal and acceptable calibration point. It is equivalent to the concentration of the  
lowest calibration standards, assuming that all method-specified sample weights, volumes, and  
cleanup procedures have been employed.  
(d) "Mixing zone" means the portion of a water body in which a point source discharge or  
venting groundwater is mixed with the receiving water.  
(e) "Monthly average water quality-based effluent limit (WQBEL)" means an effluent  
specific water quality-based effluent limit in a national pollutant discharge elimination system  
(NPDES) permit developed to protect aquatic life, human health, and wildlife from chronic  
chemical specific toxicity or aquatic life from chronic whole effluent toxicity.  
(f) "National pollutant discharge elimination system (NPDES)" means a permit issued by  
the department to a discharger pursuant to sections 3106 and 3112 of 1994 PA 451, MCL 324.3106  
and 324.3112.  
(g) "New discharge" means any building, structure, facility, or installation from which  
there is or may be a discharge of toxic substances to the surface waters of the state, the  
construction of which commenced after July 29, 1997.  
(h) "Nonpoint source" means a source of a toxic substance to the surface waters of the state  
other than a source defined as a point source.  
(i) "Permittee" means the individual or facility that is issued an NPDES permit.  
(j) "Point source" means a discharge that is released to the surface waters of the state by a  
discernible, confined, and discrete conveyance, including any of the following from which  
wastewater is or may be discharged:  
(i) A pipe.  
(ii) A ditch.  
(iii) A channel.  
(iv) A tunnel.  
(v) A conduit.  
(vi) A well.  
(vii) A discrete fissure.  
(viii) A container.  
(ix) A concentrated animal feeding operation.  
(x) A boat or other watercraft.  
Page 4  
(k) "Pollution prevention" means eliminating or minimizing the initial generation of waste  
at the source or utilizing environmentally sound on-site and off-site reuse or recycling. Waste  
treatment, release, or disposal is not considered pollution prevention.  
(l) "Quantification level" means the measurement of the concentration of a contaminant  
obtained by using a specified laboratory procedure calculated at a specified concentration above  
the detection level. It is considered the lowest concentration at which a particular contaminant  
can be quantitatively measured using a specified laboratory procedure for monitoring of the  
contaminant.  
(m) "Raw water" means the surface waters of the state before any treatment.  
(n) "Receiving water" means the surface waters of the state into which an effluent is or may  
be discharged.  
(o) "Same body of water" means that, for purposes of evaluating intake toxic substances  
consistent with R 323.1211, the department will consider intake toxic substances to be from the  
same body of water if the department finds that the intake toxic substance would have reached the  
vicinity of the outfall point in the receiving water within a reasonable period had it not been  
removed by the permittee and there is a direct hydrological connection between the intake and the  
discharge points. Notwithstanding the provisions of this subdivision, an intake toxic substance  
shall be considered to be from the same body of water if the permittee's intake point is located on a  
Great Lake and the outfall point is in close proximity to the intake point and is located on a  
tributary of that Great Lake. In this situation, the background concentration of the toxic substance  
in the receiving water shall be similar to or greater than that in the intake water and a difference  
in any water quality characteristic between the intake and receiving water shall not result in an  
adverse impact on the receiving water. Groundwater sources of intake water can also be  
considered the same body of water if both of the following conditions are met:  
(i) The groundwater vents to the same surface water body where the discharge is  
located.  
(ii) The concentration of the intake toxic substance in the groundwater source is similar to  
the background groundwater concentration which exists at or regionally proximate to the  
groundwater source that is not attributable to any release at or regionally proximate to the source.  
Release shall be defined consistent with the September, 1996, revisions to section 324.20101 of  
1994 PA 451, MCL 324.20101. Where a release has influenced the concentration of the  
toxic substance in the groundwater source, a same body of water determination shall be made by  
the department on a case-by-case basis. For purposes of this paragraph, the background  
groundwater concentration of the intake toxic substance shall be established at the time of permit  
issuance, reissuance, or modification based on data available to the department or data  
provided by the permittee from at least 1 representative location.  
(p) "Surface waters of the state" means all of the following, but does not include drainage  
ways and ponds used solely for wastewater conveyance, treatment, or control:  
(i) The Great Lakes and their connecting waters.  
(ii) All inland lakes.  
(iii) Rivers.  
(iv) Streams.  
(v) Impoundments.  
(vi) Open drains.  
(vii) Wetlands.  
(viii) Other surface bodies of water within the confines of the state.  
Page 5  
(q) "Tier I value" means a value for aquatic life, human health, or wildlife calculated  
under R 323.1057 using a tier I toxicity data base.  
(r) "Tier II value" means a value for aquatic life or human health calculated under R  
323.1057 using a tier II toxicity data base.  
(s) "Toxicity equivalency factor (TEF)" means a reasonable estimate of the toxicity  
associated with a mixture of chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and chlorinated dibenzo-p-furans  
relative to the toxicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin.  
(t) "Toxicity reduction evaluation (TRE)" means a site-specific study conducted in a  
stepwise process designed to identify the causative agents of effluent toxicity, isolate the  
sources of toxicity, evaluate the effectiveness of toxicity control options, and then confirm the  
reduction in effluent toxicity.  
(u) "Toxic substance" means a substance, except for heat, that is present in a sufficient  
concentration or quantity that is or may become harmful to plant life, animal life, or designated  
uses. These rules apply to all of the following toxic substances:  
(i) The priority pollutant and hazardous chemicals specified in the provisions of 40  
C.F.R. §122.21, Appendix D (1990), which are adopted by reference in R 323.1221.  
(ii) The pollutants of initial focus specified in the provisions of 40 C.F.R. Part 132 (1995),  
water quality guidance for the Great Lakes system, which are adopted by reference in R  
323.1221.  
(iii) The pollutants specified in table 1.  
(iv) Any other toxic substances that the department determines are of concern at a specific  
site.  
(v) "Translator" means a value used to predict the ratio of total or total recoverable metal to  
dissolved metal in a surface water of the state that is then used to derive a total or total recoverable  
water quality-based effluent limit using dissolved aquatic life tier I or tier II values.  
(w) "Venting groundwater" means groundwater that is entering a surface water of the state  
from a facility as defined in section 20101 of 1994 PA 451, MCL 324.20101.  
(x) "Wasteload allocation (WLA)" means the allocation for an individual point source  
which is developed in accordance with R 323.1209 and which ensures that the level of water  
quality to be achieved by the point source complies with all applicable water quality standards.  
(y) "Water quality-based effluent limit (WQBEL)" means an effluent limit developed for an  
NPDES permit that will ensure that the level of water quality to be achieved by the point  
source complies with all applicable water quality standards.  
(z) "Water quality standards" means the Part 4. Water Quality Standards developed under  
Part 31 of 1994 PA 451, MCL 324.3101 et seq.  
(aa) "Water quality value" means a tier I or tier II aquatic life or human health value or tier I  
wildlife value developed under R 323.1057.  
(bb) "Wetland" means land characterized by the presence of water at a frequency and  
duration sufficient to support, and that under normal circumstances does support, wetland  
vegetation or aquatic life.  
(cc) "Whole effluent toxicity" means the total toxic effect of an effluent measured directly  
with a toxicity test under R 323.1219.  
(dd) "Wildlife value" means the maximum ambient water concentration of a substance at  
which adverse effects are not likely to result in population-level impacts to mammalian and  
avian wildlife populations from lifetime exposure through drinking water and aquatic food  
supply, using the methodology specified in R 323.1057(3).  
Page 6  
Table 1.  
1-amino-2-methylanthraquinone  
1-chloro-4-phenoxybenzene  
1,1,1,2-tetrachloroethane  
1,2-epoxybutane  
1,2,3-trichlorobenzene  
1,2:3,4-diepoxybutane  
1,2,3,5-tetrachlorobenzene  
1,3-butadiene  
1,3-propane sultone  
1,4-dioxane  
1,5-naphthalenediamine  
2-acetylaminofluorene  
2-aminoanthraquinone  
2-methyl-1-nitroanthraquinone  
2-naphthylamine  
2-nitropropane  
2,4-diaminoanisole sulfate  
2,4-diaminotoluene  
2,3,4,5-tetrachlorophenol  
2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol  
2,3,5,6-tetrachlorophenol  
2,4,5-trichlorophenol  
2,4,5-trichlorotoluene  
2,4,5-trimethylaniline  
3-amino-9-ethylcarbazole  
3-amino-9-ethylcarbazole hydrochloride  
3-(chloromethyl)pyridine hydrochloride  
4-aminobiphenyl  
4-chloro-m-phenylenediamine  
4-chloro-o-phenylenediamine  
4-dimethylaminoazobenzene  
4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether  
4,4'-methylenebis (2-methylaniline)  
4,4'-methylenebis(N,N-dimethyl) benzenamine  
4,4'-thiodianiline  
5-chloro-o-toluidine  
5-nitro-o-anisidine  
5-nitroacenaphthene  
Abietic ccid  
Acetone cyanohydrin  
Actinomycin D  
Aflatoxins  
Aldicarb  
Aminoazobenzene  
Amitrole  
Anilazine  
Page 7  
Aniline hydrochloride  
Antimycin A  
1-amino-2-methylanthraquinone Aramite  
Azinphos-ethyl  
Azinphos-methyl  
Azobenzene  
Barban  
Bendiocarb  
Benomyl  
Bis(chloromethyl)ether  
Bromomethane  
Bromoxynil  
Butylbutanol nitrosamine  
Captafol  
Carbophenothion  
Chloramines  
Chlordecone  
Chlorfenvinphos  
Chlorinated dibenzofurans  
Chlorobenzilate  
Chloromethane  
Chloroprene  
Clonitralid  
Crotoxyphos  
Cupferron  
Cycasin  
Cycloheximide  
Cyclophosphamide  
Dehydroabietic acid  
Demeton  
Diallate  
Dibromochloropropane (DBCP)  
Dichrotophos  
Diethylhexyl phthalate  
Diethylstilbestrol  
Dihydrosafrole  
Dimethoate  
Dimethyl disulphide  
Dimethyl sulfate  
Dimethylhydrazines  
Dinocap  
Dinoseb  
Dioxathion  
Diphenyl ether  
EPN  
Ethyl chloride  
Ethylene oxide  
Page 8  
Ethylene thiourea  
Ethyleneimine  
Ethylmethanesulfonate  
Fensulfothion  
Fluchloralin  
Furathiazole  
Hexachlorocyclohexane  
Hexamethylphosphoramide  
Hydrazine  
Hydrazobenzene  
Hydrogen sulfide  
Hydroquinone  
Isonicotinic acid hydrazine  
Kanechlor C  
Ketene  
Lactonitrile  
Lasiocarpine  
Leptophos  
Malachite green  
Mestranol  
Methacrylonitrile  
Methomyl  
Methyl chloroform  
Methyl hydrazine  
Methylenebis(2-chloroaniline)  
Methylthiouracil  
Mitomycin C  
Monocrotaline  
Monocrotophos  
Mustard gas  
N-(2-hydroxyethyl) ethyleneimine  
N-methyl formamide  
N,N'-diethylthiourea  
N-nitroso-di-N-butylamine  
N-nitroso-N-ethylurea  
N-nitroso-N-methylurea  
N-nitrosodiethylamine  
N-nitrosomethylvinylamine  
N-nitrosomorpholine  
N-nitrososarcosine  
Neoabietic acid  
Nifurthiazole  
Niridazole  
Nithiazide  
Nitrofen  
Nitrogen mustard  
o-Aminoazotoluene  
Page 9  
o-Anisidine  
o-Anisidine hydrochloride  
o-Phenylphenol  
o-Toluidine  
o-Toluidine hydrochloride  
Octachlorostyrene  
Oxydemetonmethyl  
p-Chlorophenol  
p-Cresidine  
p-Nitrosodiphenylamine  
Paraquat  
Pentachloronitrobenzene  
Phenazopyridine hydrochloride  
Phenesterin  
Phenobarbitol  
Phenytoin sodium  
Phorate  
Phosazetim  
Phosmet  
Phosphamidon  
Piperonyl sulfoxide  
Polybrominated biphenyls (PBB)  
Polychlorinated naphthalenes  
Propyleneimine  
Propylthiouracil  
Rotenone  
Semicarbazide  
Semicarbazide hydrochloride  
Silvex  
Sodium fluoroacetate  
Sodium-o-phenylphenol  
Sulfallate  
Sulfotepp  
TEPP  
Terbufos  
Tetrachloroguaiacol  
Tetrachlorvinphos  
Tetranitromethane  
Thioacetamide  
Thiourea  
Thiram  
Triaryl phosphate esters  
Tributyltin (and salts and esters)  
Trichlorfon  
Trifluralin  
Trimethylphosphate  
Tris(2,3-dibromopropyl)phosphate  
Page 10  
Uracil mustard  
Urethane  
Vinyl bromide  
Ziram  
History: 1997 AACS; 2006 AACS.  
R 323.1207 Total maximum daily loads.  
Rule 1207. (1) The following general principles are applicable to establishing total  
maximum daily loads (TMDLs) for toxic substances in the surface waters of the state, with the  
exception of whole effluent toxicity:  
(a) TMDLs shall ensure attainment of applicable water quality standards for the toxic  
substances for which they are established and shall, at a minimum, be developed in accordance  
with the listing and priority setting process established in section 303(d) of the clean water act  
and 40 C.F.R.§130.7. Where water quality standards cannot be attained immediately, TMDLs  
shall reflect reasonable assurances that water quality standards will be attained in a reasonable  
period of time, with specific controls on individual sources being implemented in stages.  
Determining the reasonable period of time in which water quality standards will be met is a  
case- specific determination considering a number of factors, including all of the following  
factors:  
(i) Receiving water characteristics.  
(ii) Persistence, behavior, and ubiquity of toxic substance of concern.  
(iii) Type of remediation activities necessary.  
(iv) Available regulatory and nonregulatory controls.  
(v) Department requirements for attainment of water quality standards.  
(vi) Technical and economic feasibility of attainment.  
(b) TMDLs shall include wasteload allocations (WLAs) for point sources addressed by  
these rules and load allocations (LAs) for nonpoint sources, including background, such that the  
sum of the allocations plus a specified margin of safety (MOS) is not greater than the loading  
capacity of the water for the toxic substance addressed by the TMDL. TMDL allocations are  
as follows:  
(i) Nonpoint source LAs shall be based on all of the following factors:  
(A) Existing toxic substance loadings if changes in loadings are not reasonably  
anticipated to occur.  
(B) Increases in toxic substance loadings that are reasonably anticipated tooccur.  
(C) Anticipated decreases in toxic substance loadings if the decreased loadings are  
technically feasible and are reasonably anticipated to occur within a reasonable time period as  
a result of implementation of best management practices or other load reduction measures.  
In determining whether anticipated decreases in toxic substance loadings are technically  
feasible and can be expected to occur within a reasonable period of time, technical and  
institutional factors shall be considered. These decisions are case-specific and shall reflect the  
particular TMDL under consideration.  
(ii) The sum of the WLAs is the portion of the loading capacity that is not assigned to an  
MOS or to nonpoint sources including background.National pollutant discharge elimination system  
(NPDES) permits for the point sources shall include effluent limitations consistent with WLAs in  
TMDLs.  
Page 11  
(c) If separate TMDLs are prepared for different, but overlapping, segments of the same  
watershed and the separate TMDLs each include WLAs for the same toxic substances for 1 or  
more of the same point sources, then WQBELs for that toxic substance for the point source or  
sources shall be consistent with the most stringent of the WLAs to ensure attainment of all  
applicable water quality standards.  
(d) Each TMDL shall include an MOS sufficient to account for technical uncertainties in  
establishing the TMDL and shall describe the manner in which the MOS is determined and  
incorporated into the TMDL. The MOS may be provided by leaving a portion of the loading  
capacity unallocated or by using conservative modeling assumptions to establish WLAs and LAs.  
The MOS may also include reserved allocation for future growth.  
(e) Where appropriate and where sufficient data or sediment criteria are available, TMDLs  
shall prevent the accumulation of the toxic substance in the sediment to levels injurious to  
designated or existing uses and shall reflect contributions to the water column from the sediments.  
(f) Where appropriate and where sufficient data are available, TMDLs shall reflect  
loadings of toxic substance discharges resulting from wet- weather events  
(g) The representative background concentration of toxic substances to develop TMDLs  
and WLAs calculated in the absence of a TMDL shall be established as follows:  
(i) "Background" represents all toxic substance loadings as specified by the following:  
(A) Flow from upstream waters into the specified watershed, water body, or water body  
segment for which a TMDL or WLA in the absence of a TMDL is being developed.  
(B)  
Enter the specified watershed, water body, or water body segment through  
atmospheric deposition, chemical reaction, or sediment release or resuspension.  
(ii) When determining what available data are acceptable for use in calculating  
background, the department shall use its best professional judgment, including consideration  
of the sampling location and the reliability of the data through comparison, in part, to  
detection and quantification levels. When data in more than 1 of the data sets or categories  
described in paragraph (iii) of this subdivision exists, best professional judgment shall be used  
to select the data that most accurately reflects or estimates background concentrations. Toxic  
substance degradation and transport information may be considered when using toxic  
substance loading data to estimate a water column concentration.  
(iii) The representative background concentration for a toxic substance in the specified  
watershed, water body, or water body segment shall be established as the geometric mean of  
acceptable water column data or water column concentrations estimated through the use of  
acceptable or projected toxic substance loading data. When determining the geometric mean of  
the data for a toxic substance that includes values both above and below the detection level,  
values less than the detection level shall be assumed to be present at 1/2 of the detection level if  
the detection level is less than the lowest water quality value for that substance. If all of the  
acceptable data in a data set are below the detection level for a toxic substance, then all the data  
for the toxic substance in that data set shall be assumed to be zero. If the detection level of the  
available data is greater than the lowest water quality value for the substance, then the background  
concentration will be determined by the department on a case-by-case basis after considering all  
representative data, including acceptable fish tissue data.  
(h) If the margin of safety does not include a reserved allocation, then any increased  
loadings of the toxic substance for which the TMDL was developed that are due to a new or  
expanded discharge shall not be allowed unless the TMDL is revised in accordance with these  
procedures to include an allocation for the new or expanded discharge.  
Page 12  
(2) If the department develops an alternative type of assessment and remediation plan  
that meets the requirements of this rule and public participation requirements applicable to  
TMDLs, then the assessment and remediation plan may be used instead of a TMDL. The  
assessment and remediation plans may include lakewide management plans, remedial action  
plans for the areas of concern designated by the international joint commission, and state  
water quality management plans. Also, any part of an assessment and remediation plan that  
satisfies 1 or more requirements under section 303(d) of the clean water act or implementing  
regulations may be incorporated by reference into a TMDL as appropriate. Assessment and  
remediation plans under this subrule shall be tailored to the level of detail and magnitude for the  
watershed and toxic substance being assessed.  
(3) Design flows for establishing TMDLs in lotic waters are given in R 323.1090.  
(4) If a TMDL has been established for a water body receiving the direct discharge of point  
sources, then the chronic WLA for each point source shall equal a fraction of the loading capacity  
assigned to point sources that discharge to the water body, but shall not be greater than the  
chronic WLA established by the procedures in R 323.1209, unless the TMDL reflects  
anticipated decreases in nonpoint source loadings through a phased approach to water quality  
standards attainment. Acute WLAs shall be established in accordance with R 323.1209.  
(5) It is not necessary to establish a TMDL for all waters that may be affected by a point  
source or nonpoint source before establishing a WLA or LA for the respective sources.  
(6) TMDLs and WLAs in the absence of a TMDL shall be based on the assumption that  
environmental fate or other physical, chemical, or biological factors do not affect the concentration  
of the toxic substances in the water column, unless both of the following occur:  
(a) Scientifically valid field studies or other relevant information demonstrate that  
degradation of the toxic substance is expected to occur during typical environmental conditions  
expected to be encountered.  
(b) Scientifically valid field studies or other information address other factors that affect the  
level of toxic substance in the water column including:  
(i) Sediment release or resuspension.  
(ii) Chemical speciation.  
(iii) Biological and chemical transformation.  
History: 1997 AACS.  
R 323.1209 Development of wasteload allocations for toxic substances.  
Rule 1209. (1) In the absence of a total maximum daily load (TMDL) established under R  
323.1207, or where consistent with a TMDL, the following procedure shall be used to  
calculate individual point source wasteload allocations (WLAs) for aquatic life, human  
health, and wildlife values consistent with the requirements of R 323.1211(2):  
(a) Chronic WLAs for discharges to lotic waters shall be developed for the toxic substance as  
follows:  
WLA = Zt (Qe + Qr) - (Qr)(Cr) Qe  
or  
Page 13  
WLA = (Zd)(T) (Qe + Qr) - (Qr)(Cr) Qe  
Wher  
e:  
Zt = water quality value developed for the toxic substance expressed as total or total  
recoverable.  
Zd = water quality value for aquatic life expressed as dissolved metal. Values expressed as  
dissolved, but for which a translator (T) is not available, shall be expressed as total or total  
recoverable for purposes of this subdivision.  
T = dissolved to total metal translator for aquatic life wasteload allocations. For the metals in  
table 2, T equals the given value or one derived from site- specific data. For metals not listed in  
table 2, T is equal to a translator derived by the department when sufficient information is  
available or from site-specific data.  
Qe = effluent design flow, which is the annual average design flow for municipalities and  
maximum authorized flow for other facilities, unless it can be demonstrated to the department that  
an alternate design flow is appropriate.  
Qr = flow of the receiving water allocated for mixing under R 323.1082. If a discharger has an  
intake upstream of the point of discharge, then Qr shall reflect the reduction in the design flow  
volume attributable to the intake.  
Cr = receiving water background concentration of the toxic substance developed under  
R 323.1207(1)(g).  
The lowest of the WLAs developed under this subdivision for the chronic aquatic life,  
human health, or wildlife values for each toxic substance shall be the basis for the water  
quality-based effluent limit (WQBEL) as specified in R 323.1211(4)(a).  
Table  
2.  
Dissolved to total metal translators for aquatic life wasteload allocations.  
Toxic Substance  
Translator (T)  
Cadmium...................................................2.1  
Chromium..................................................1.5  
Copper.......................................................1.5  
Lead..........................................................4.5  
Nickel........................................................1.1  
Zinc...........................................................2.1  
(b) Chronic WLAs for discharges to the Great Lakes and inland lakes shall be developed for a  
toxic substance as follows:  
WLA = (Zt)(1 + Q) - (Cr)(Q)  
or  
WLA = (Zd)(T)(1 + Q) - (Cr)(Q)  
Where:  
Page 14  
Zt = the lowest water quality value developed for the toxic substance expressed as total  
or total recoverable.  
Zd = water quality value for aquatic life expressed as dissolved metal. Values expressed as  
dissolved, but for which a translator (T) is not available, shall be expressed as total or total  
recoverable for purposes of this subdivision.  
T = dissolved to total translator for aquatic life wasteload allocations. For the metals in table  
2, T equals the given value or one derived from site- specific data. For the metals not listed in  
table 2, T is equal to a translator derived by the department when sufficient information is  
available or from site-specific data.  
Q = number of parts receiving water allocated for mixing under R 323.1082(5).  
Cr = receiving water background concentration of the toxic substance developed under R  
323.1207(1)(g).  
The lowest of the WLAs developed under this subdivision for the chronic aquatic life,  
human health, or wildlife values for each toxic substance shall be the basis for the WQBEL as  
specified in R 323.1211(4)(a).  
(2) If the receiving water background concentration (Cr) of a toxic substance exceeds the most  
stringent applicable water quality value for that substance, then the WLA shall be established  
equal to the most stringent water quality values, unless the provisions of  
for a different approach.  
R 323.1211(7)(d) allow  
(3) WLAs based upon acute aquatic life protection shall not exceed the following acute WLA,  
unless it can be demonstrated to the department that a higher level is acceptable under R  
323.1082(1). :  
Page 15  
WLA = (At)  
or  
WLA = (Ad)(T)  
Where:  
At = the final acute value developed for the toxic substance under R 323.1057  
expressed as total or total recoverable.  
Ad = final acute value for aquatic life expressed as dissolved metal under R  
323.1057. Values expressed as dissolved, but for which a translator (T) is not  
available, shall be expressed as total or total recoverable for purposes of this  
subdivision.  
T= dissolved to total translator for aquatic life wasteload allocations. For the  
metals in table 2, T equals the given value or one derived from site- specific data.  
For the metals not listed in table 2, T is equal to a translator derived by the  
department when sufficient information is available or from site-specific data.  
(4) When establishing WLAs based on human health values for individual point  
source discharges, the potential interaction between multiple toxic substances in the  
effluent shall be addressed by the following provisions:  
(a) If an effluent contains carcinogens for which available scientific information  
supports a reasonable assumption that the toxic substances produce the same type of  
cancer through the same mechanism of action and for which WQBELs are required  
pursuant to R 323.1211 on an individual basis, then the total incremental risk created by  
the effluent in the surface waters of the state after mixing with the allowable receiving  
water body volume specified in R 323.1082 shall not exceed 1 X 10-5for individual  
carcinogens and 1 X 10-4for the total effluent. This additivity provision shall be  
implemented on a case-by-case basis and shall be evaluated at each facility independent  
of other carcinogens that may be present in the receiving water.  
(b) If an effluent contains 2 or more noncarcinogens for which available scientific  
information supports a reasonable assumption that the toxic substances produce the same  
adverse effects through the same mechanisms of action and for which WQBELs are  
required under R 323.1211 on an individual basis, then the noncarcinogenic effects of  
the chemicals may be assumed additive and considered by the department when  
calculating WLAs protective of human health. This subdivision shall be implemented  
on a case-by-case basis and shall be evaluated at each facility independent of other  
noncarcinogens that may be present in the receiving stream.  
(c) Notwithstanding the requirements in subdivisions (a) and (b) of this subrule,  
human health-based WLAs for the chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (CDDs) and  
chlorinated dibenzofurans (CDFs) listed in table 2 shall be calculated using the  
following procedures:  
(i) The human cancer value and human noncancer value for 2,3,7,8-TCDD shall be  
used consistent with the procedures in subrules (1) and (2) of this rule to calculate total  
2,3,7,8-TCDD toxicity equivalence WLAs for effluents.  
Page 16  
(ii) The toxicity equivalency factors (TEFs) and bioaccumulation equivalency  
factors (BEFs) in table 2 3 shall be used to calculate a 2,3,7,8- TCDD toxicity  
equivalence concentration for an effluent when implementing the WLAs derived in  
paragraph (i) of this subdivision. The equation for calculating the 2,3,7,8-TCDD  
toxicity equivalence concentration in an effluent is as follows:  
(TEC)  
TCDD  
= Σ(C) (TEF) (BEF)  
x x x  
Where:  
(TEC)  
= 2,3,7,8-TCDD toxicity equivalence concentration in the  
TCDD  
discharge.  
(C) = the concentration of congener x in the discharge.  
x
(TEF) = toxicity equivalency factor for congener x.  
x
(BEF) = bioaccumulation equivalency factor for congener x.  
x
Table 3. Toxicity equivalency factors and BEFs for CDDs and CDFs.  
Congener  
TEF  
BEF  
2,3,7,8-TCDD  
1.0  
1.0  
1,2,3,7,8-PeCDD  
1,2,3,4,7,8-HxCDD  
1,2,3,6,7,8-HxCDD  
1,2,3,7,8,9-HxCDD  
1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpCDD  
OCDD  
0.5  
0.1  
0.1  
0.1  
0.01  
0.001  
0.1  
0.9  
0.3  
0.1  
0.1  
0.05  
0.01  
0.8  
2,3,7,8-TCDF  
1,2,3,7,8-PeCDF  
2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF  
1,2,3,4,7,8-HxCDF  
1,2,3,6,7,8-HxCDF  
2,3,4,6,7,8-HxCDF  
1,2,3,7,8,9-HxCDF  
1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpCDF  
1,2,3,4,7,8,9-HpCDF  
OCDF  
0.05  
0.5  
0.1  
0.1  
0.1  
0.2  
1.6  
0.08  
0.2  
0.7  
0.6  
0.01  
0.4  
0.1  
0.01  
0.01  
0.001  
0.02  
History: 1997 AACS; 2006 AACS.  
R 323.1211 Reasonable potential for chemical-specific water quality-based  
effluent limits (WQBELs).  
Rule 1211. (1) Chemical-specific water quality-based effluent limits (WQBELs)  
shall be incorporated into a national pollutant discharge elimination system (NPDES)  
permit where the department determines that a toxic substance is or may be discharged  
into the waters of the state at a level that has the reasonable potential to cause or  
contribute to an excursion above any water quality value. The determination shall be  
made by developing preliminary effluent limitations (PELs) and comparing the effluent  
limitations to the potential effluent quality (PEQ) of the discharge.  
Page 17  
(2) PELs shall be developed for each toxic substance that the permittee reports as  
known or believed to be present in its discharge using the wasteload allocation  
(WLA) provisions specified in R 323.1207 or R  
323.1209. At a minimum, PELs are required and shall be developed for the  
protection of aquatic life and noncancer human health effects where aquatic life values,  
human noncancer values, or the minimum data to calculate the aquatic life or human  
noncancer values are available. If there are insufficient data to calculate aquatic life or  
human noncancer values, then the department shall follow the provisions in subrule (6)  
of this rule. PELs shall also be developed for the protection of wildlife and human  
health cancer effects where human cancer values, wildlife values, or the minimum data  
to calculate human cancer or wildlife values are available.  
(3) The PEQs shall be determined by either of the following procedures:  
(a) If 10 or more representative facility-specific effluent samples are available that  
are greater than the detection limit, then the maximum PEQ shall equal the upper  
ninetififth percentile of all the representative daily discharge concentrations and the  
average PEQ shall equal the upper ninetififth percentile of all the representative 30-  
day average discharge concentrations. The upper ninetififth percentile of the daily  
discharge concentrations and 30-day average discharge concentrations shall be  
calculated as follows:  
P
= exp (mu + Z sigma )  
dn dn  
95  
p
Where:  
P
= upper ninetififth percentile of n-day average discharge  
95  
concentrations.  
d = ratio of the number of daily discharge concentrations less than the limit of  
detection to the total number of discharge concentrations.  
n = number of discharge concentrations used to calculate an average over  
a specified monitoring period (n=1 for daily concentrations and 30 for 30- day  
averages).  
exp = base e (or approximately 2.718) raised to the power shown between the  
parentheses in the P95 equation.  
Z = Z value corresponding to the upper p percentile of the standard normal  
p
th  
distribution.  
p = (0.95-d )/(1-d ).  
n
n
(sigmad)2 (sigmadn)2  
mudn = mud +  
(1-d)  
+ ln  
= estimated log mean of n-  
day average discharge  
2
(1-dn)  
concentrations greater than the limit of detection. (Note: mudn = mud if n=1)  
Page 18  
2
s
(sigmadn)2 = ln ( 1-dn ) 1+ m  
+
average discharge  
n - 1  
= estimated log variance of n-day  
n(1-d)  
n
concentrations greater than the limit of detection (Note: (sigmadn)2 = (sigmad)2 if  
n=1).  
mu = 1n m - 0.5 (sigma ) = estimated log mean of discharge  
2
d
d
concentrations greater than the limit of detection  
2
2
(sigma )  
= 1n [1 + (s/m) ] = estimated log from variance of discharge  
d
concentrations greater than the limit of detection.  
ln = natural logarithm.  
m = mean of discharge concentrations greater than the limit of detection.  
s = standard deviation of discharge concentrations greater than the limit of detection.  
Reasonable potential for the discharge of a toxic substance to cause or contribute to  
an excursion above any water quality value will be considered to exist if the average or  
maximum PEQ exceeds any of the chronic or acute PELs, respectively, developed in  
accordance with subrule (2) of this rule.  
(b) If sufficient data are not available to use the process described in subdivision (a)  
of this subrule, then the PEQ shall be determined by identifying the total number of  
representative effluent samples, both detectable and nondetectable, and multiplying the  
maximum effluent concentration by the appropriate factor from table 3 4 developed by  
assuming a 0.6 coefficient of variation. Reasonable potential for the discharge of a  
toxic substance to cause or contribute to an excursion above any water quality value will  
be considered to exist if the PEQ exceeds any of the PELs developed in accordance with  
subrule (2) of this rule. For purposes of this subdivision, the department shall consider  
other scientifically defensible approaches on a case-by-case basis which are consistent  
with procedure 5.B.2 of Appendix F, 40 C.F.R. Part 132 (1995), which is adopted by  
reference in R 323.1221, for use in determining reasonable potential. If requested by  
the permittee, one such approach that is acceptable to the department is the prediction  
level concept specified in Gibbons, 1994, Statistical Methods for Groundwater  
Monitoring - Wiley, New York where representative effluent data appropriate for use  
with this method is provided. If the prediction level approach is proposed for use with  
data sets containing values both above and below the detection level, then a process to  
address the less than detection values, that is acceptable to the department, shall be  
provided by the permittee.  
Table 4. Reasonable potential multiplying factors:  
95% confidence level and 95% probability basis.  
Number of Samples  
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Page 19  
Multiplying Factor  
1.8  
6.2  
11  
3.8  
12  
3.0  
13  
2.6  
14  
2.3  
15  
2.1  
16  
2.0  
17  
1.9  
18  
10  
19  
1.7  
1.7 1.6  
1.6  
1.5  
1.5  
1.5  
1.4  
1.4  
1.4  
20  
30  
1.2  
40  
50  
60  
70  
80  
90  
100  
0.9  
1.4  
1.1  
1.0  
1.0  
0.9  
0.9  
0.9  
(4) If the analysis in subrule (3) of this rule demonstrates that the toxic substance  
concentration has a reasonable potential to cause or contribute to an excursion above any  
water quality value, then a WQBEL or WQBELs shall be established in the permit. For  
the purpose of an NPDES permit, a chronic or acute WLA based on a water quality  
value shall be equal to a WQBEL and shall be expressed using the following permit  
averaging periods:  
(a) Chronic WLAs for the protection of aquatic life, human health, and wildlife  
shall be expressed as monthly average WQBELs.  
(b) Acute WLAs for the protection of aquatic life shall be expressed as daily  
maximum WQBELs.  
Monitoring frequency to evaluate compliance with WQBELs shall be  
established by the department on a case-by-case basis.  
(5) Monthly average WQBELs shall be expressed as both a concentration value and  
a corresponding mass load. The mass and concentration limits shall be calculated  
using the same facility design flows. Appropriate adjustments may be made to  
address facilities that receive wet-weather flows. Daily maximum WQBELs shall be  
expressed as both a concentration value and a corresponding mass load for those  
substances identified in  
R 323.1205(u)(ii) and other toxic substances as appropriate.  
(6) For each toxic substance which a permittee reports as known or believed to be  
present in its discharge, and for which data sufficient to calculate tier II values for  
noncancer human health and aquatic life do not exist, all of the following provisions  
apply:  
(a) The department shall use all available, relevant toxicity information to estimate  
ambient screening values for the toxic substance that will protect humans from  
noncancer health effects and aquatic life from acute and chronic effects.  
(b) Using the provisions specified in R 323.1209, the department shall develop PELs  
based on the estimated ambient screening value and compare the PELs with the PEQ. If  
the PEQ exceeds any of the PELs, then the department shall generate, or require the  
permittee to generate, the minimum data necessary to derive tier II values for noncancer  
human health and aquatic life.  
(c) The data generated in accordance with subdivision (b) of this subrule shall be  
used to calculate water quality values. The values shall be used in calculating the  
Page 20  
PELs pursuant to subrule (2) of this rule for the purpose of determining whether a  
WQBEL must be included in the permit. If the department finds that the PEQ exceeds  
the PEL, then a WQBEL for the toxic substance shall be established in the permit  
consistent with R 323.1211.  
(7) All of the following conditions apply when considering intake toxic  
substances in establishing limitations in NPDES permits:  
(a) The department may determine that there is no reasonable potential for the  
discharge of an identified intake toxic substance to cause or contribute to an  
excursion above any water quality value if a discharger demonstrates, to the  
satisfaction of the department, or the department determines, all of the following:  
(i) The facility withdraws 100% of the intake water containing the toxic substance  
from the same body of water into which the discharge is made. (ii) The facility does  
not contribute a measurable increased mass of the  
identified intake toxic substance to its wastewater.  
(iii) The facility does not alter the identified intake toxic substance chemically or  
physically in a manner that would cause adverse water quality impacts to occur that  
would not occur if the toxic substances were left in- stream.  
(iv) The facility does not increase the identified intake toxic substance concentration,  
as defined by the department, at the edge of the mixing zone or if a mixing zone is not  
allowed at the point of discharge, as compared to the toxic substance concentration in  
the intake water, unless the increased concentration does not cause or contribute to an  
excursion above an applicable water quality standard.  
(v) The timing and location of the discharge would not cause adverse water  
quality impacts to occur that would not occur if the identified intake toxic substance  
were left in-stream.  
(b) If there is a finding under subdivision (a) of this subrule that a toxic substance in  
the discharge does not have the reasonable potential to cause or contribute to an  
excursion above a water quality value, then a WQBEL is unnecessary and the permit  
may require monitoring necessary to demonstrate that the conditions in subdivision (a)  
of this subrule are maintained during the permit term. Unique situations for  
commingled waste streams at facilities will be addressed on a case-by-case basis.  
(c) Absent a finding under subdivision (a) of this subrule, the department shall use  
the procedures described in subrules (2) through (5) of this rule to determine whether a  
discharge has the reasonable potential to cause or contribute to an excursion above any  
water quality value.  
(d) If the background receiving water concentration of the intake toxic substance  
of concern exceeds the most stringent applicable water quality value for that toxic  
substance, then all of the following provisions apply:  
(i) If the facility meets the conditions in subdivision (a)(i) and (iii) to (v) of this  
subrule, then a no net addition limit may be established for the toxic substance of  
concern at a mass and concentration that are no greater than the mass and concentration  
of the toxic substance identified in the facility’s intake water. In determining whether  
there has been an addition, recognized statistical concepts shall be considered. For toxic  
substances contained in the intake water provided by a water system, the concentration  
of the intake toxic substance shall be determined at the point where the raw water is  
removed from the same body of water, except that it shall be the point where the water  
Page 21  
enters the water supplier’s distribution system where the water treatment system  
removes any of the identified toxic substances from the raw water supply. Mass shall  
be determined by multiplying the concentration of the toxic substance by the volume of  
the facility’s intake flow received from the water system. Following establishment of a  
TMDL developed under R 323.1207 for the water body segment encompassing the  
facility, any use of no net addition limits shall be consistent with the TMDL.  
Note: The Water Quality Guidance for the Great Lakes System, 40 C.F.R. Part  
132 (1995), indicates that a permit may not authorize no net addition limits that are  
effective after March 23, 2007. The preamble to 40 C.F.R. Part 132 indicates that  
the environmental protection agency (EPA) will revisit this requirement by March  
23, 2002, to consider possible extensions. After the redetermination by EPA, the  
department will consider modifying these rules to incorporate a phaseout date for no  
net addition limits, if still necessary.  
(ii) If the intake toxic substance in a facility’s discharge originates from a water  
that is not the same body of water as the receiving water, then WQBELs shall be  
established based upon the most stringent water quality value for that toxic substance.  
(iii) If a facility discharges an intake toxic substance that originates in part from the  
same body of water, and in part from a different body of water, then the department  
may apply the conditions of paragraphs (i) and (ii) of this subdivision to derive an  
effluent limitation reflecting the flow-weighted average of each source of the toxic  
substance.  
History: 1997 A A C S ; 2006 AACS.  
R 323.1213 WQBELs less than quantification level.  
Rule 1213. (1) If a water quality-based effluent limit (WQBEL) for a toxic  
substance is calculated to be less than the quantification level, then all of the following  
provisions apply:  
(a) The department shall designate, in the national pollutant discharge elimination  
system (NPDES) permit, the WQBEL as calculated.  
(b) The permit shall state, for the purpose of compliance assessment, the analytical  
method to be used to monitor the amount of toxic substance in the effluent and the  
quantification level. The analytical method specified shall be the most sensitive,  
applicable, analytical method specified in or approved under the pollutant testing  
regulations set forth in 40 C.F.R. §136 (2000), which are adopted by reference in R  
323.1221, or other appropriate method that provides confirmation and verification  
acceptable to the department if one is not available under 40 C.F.R. §136 (2000). The  
permit shall also state that if an effluent sample is less than the quantification level,  
then the permittee shall be considered in compliance for the period that the sample  
represents if the pollutant minimization program (PMP) described in subdivision (d) of  
this subrule is being fully performed.  
(c) The quantification level shall be the minimum level (ML) specified in, or  
approved under, 40 C.F.R. §136 (2000), which are adopted by reference in R 323.1221,  
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for the method for that toxic substance. If such ML does not exists, or if the method  
is not specified or approved under 40 C.F.R. §136 (2000), then the quantification level  
shall be the lowest quantifiable level practicable as established by procedures approved  
by the department. When establishing a quantification level, the department shall  
consider the achievability of the value by competent commercial laboratories. The  
permittee shall be given the opportunity to demonstrate that a higher quantification  
level is appropriate because of sample matrix interference.  
(d) The permit shall contain a special condition requiring the permittee to develop  
and conduct a PMP for each toxic substance with a WQBEL below the quantification  
level, unless the permittee can demonstrate to the department that an alternate technique  
is available and will be used to assess compliance with the WQBEL. The goal of  
the PMP shall be to maintain the effluent concentration of the toxic substance at or  
below the WQBEL. The department shall consider cost-effectiveness during the  
development and implementation of a PMP. The permit shall require the submittal of a  
PMP by the permittee that describes the control strategy designed to proceed toward  
achievement of the goal and shall include all of the following:  
(i) An annual review and semiannual monitoring of potential sources of the toxic  
substance.  
(ii) Quarterly monitoring for the toxic substance in the influent to the wastewater  
treatment system.  
(iii) A commitment by the permittee that reasonable cost-effective control measures  
will be implemented when sources of the toxic substance are discovered. Factors to  
be considered shall include all of the following:  
(A) Significance of sources.  
(B) Economic considerations.  
(C) Technical and treatability considerations.  
(iv) An annual status report. The report shall be sent to the department and shall  
include all of the following:  
(A) All minimization program monitoring results for the previous year.  
(B) A list of potential sources of the toxic substance.  
(C) A summary of all actions taken to reduce or eliminate the identified sources of  
the toxic substance. The requirements of paragraphs (i) to (iv) of this subdivision  
may be modified by the department on a case-by-case basis.  
(e) The permit may contain a special condition requiring fish tissue monitoring  
or other biouptake sampling, or both, or facility sludge monitoring to assess the  
progress of the PMP.  
(f) The permit shall contain a reopener clause indicating that any information  
generated as a result of the PMP described in subdivision (d) of this subrule may be  
used to support a request for subsequent permit modification, including revision or  
removal of the PMP requirement.  
(g) The quantification level specified in a NPDES permit pursuant to this rule shall  
remain in effect until the permit is modified or reissued. If the quantification level is  
reduced through a permit modification or reissuance, then the permittee may be eligible  
for a compliance schedule under R 323.1217 and a variance under R 323.1103.  
History: 1997 AACS; 2006 AACS.  
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R 323.1215 Special conditions for bioaccumulative chemicals of concern (BCCs).  
Rule 1215. Conditions shall be established in national pollutant discharge  
elimination system (NPDES) permits that require the permittee to monitor for BCCs  
expected to be present in the discharge as a result of operations at the facility. The permit  
shall also contain a provision, consistent with R 323.1098, that prohibits the permittee  
from undertaking any action that would result in a lowering of water quality from an  
increased loading of a BCC unless an increased use request, including an antidegradation  
demonstration, has been submitted and approved by the department. The permit shall  
also require that the department be notified within 10 days of the permittee becoming  
aware that a lowering of water quality from an increased loading of a BCC has occurred.  
History: 1997 AACS.  
R 323.1217 Compliance schedules.  
Rule 1217. (1) If a permit issued to a new discharger contains a water quality-  
based effluent limitation (WQBEL) for a toxic substance, then the permittee shall  
comply with the limitation upon commencement of the discharge. Compliance  
schedules may be granted for new or more stringent WQBELs contained in a  
modification to the permit or subsequently issued permits.  
(2) Any existing permit that is reissued or modified to contain a new or more  
restrictive WQBEL for a toxic substance or a lower quantification level established  
under R 323.1213 may allow a reasonable period of time, up to 5 years from the date of  
permit issuance or modification, for the permittee to comply with the new or more  
restrictive WQBEL or lower quantification level. When a compliance schedule goes  
beyond the term of a permit, an interim permit limit shall become effective on or  
before the permit expiration date.  
(3) If a permit establishes a schedule of compliance under subrule (2) of this rule  
that exceeds 1 year from the date of permit issuance or modification, then the  
schedule shall set forth interim requirements and dates for achievement of the  
requirements, as appropriate.  
(4) If a WQBEL for a toxic substance based upon a tier II value derived under R  
323.1057 is included in a reissued or modified permit for an existing discharger, then the  
permit shall provide a reasonable period of time, up to 2 years, in which to provide  
additional data necessary to develop a tier I value or to modify the tier II value.  
Information submitted to modify the tier II value may also include site-specific data and  
any such site-specific modifications shall be calculated according to the site-specific  
modification requirements of R 323.1057. The permit shall require compliance with  
the tier II limitation within a reasonable period of time, which shall not be more than 5  
years after permit issuance or modification, and shall contain a reopener clause.  
(5) The reopener clause specified in subrule (4) of this rule shall authorize  
permit modifications if additional data have been provided by the permittee or a third  
party during the time allowed to provide the data and if the permittee or a third party  
demonstrates that a revised WQBEL for a toxic substance is appropriate. The revised  
WQBEL shall be incorporated through a permit modification and areasonable time  
period, up to 5 years from the date of modification, shall be allowed for compliance. If  
Page 24  
incorporated before the compliance date of the original tier II limitation, any such  
revised WQBEL shall not be considered less stringent for purposes of the  
antibacksliding provisions of section 402(o) of the clean water act (CWA).  
(6) If the specified studies have been completed and do not demonstrate that a  
revised WQBEL is appropriate, then the department shall provide a reasonable  
additional period of time, not to exceed 5 years, to achieve compliance with the  
original WQBEL.  
(7) If future studies other than those conducted under subrule (4) of this rule result  
in a water quality value being changed to a less stringent value, after the effective date of  
a WQBEL for that substance, the existing WQBEL may be revised to be less stringent  
if 1 of the following provisions is met:  
(a) The less stringent WQBEL complies with sections 402(o)(2) and (3) of the  
clean water act.  
(b) The less stringent WQBEL complies with water quality standards or is  
consistent with a department-approved total  
nonattainment waters.  
maximum  
daily  
load  
in  
(c) The less stringent WQBEL complies with R 323.1098 in attained waters.  
History: 1997 AACS; 2006 AACS.  
R 323.1219 Whole effluent toxicity.  
Rule 1219. (1) For the purpose of evaluating the need for whole effluent toxicity  
(WET) limits or conditions in point source discharges, the narrative WET standard  
specified in R 323.1057(6) shall be interpreted as follows:  
(a) An effluent shall not exceed 1.0 acute toxic unit (TU ), unless a higher level is  
a
acceptable consistent with R 323.1082(1).  
(b) An effluent shall not cause or contribute to an exceedance of 1.0  
chronic toxic unit (TU ) in the surface waters of the state outside of any  
c
department-approvedmixing zone.  
(2) If the department determines under subrule (4) of this rule that the WET of an  
effluent is or may be discharged at a level that will cause or contribute to an excursion  
above the narrative WET standard specified in R  
323.1057(6), then the department shall implement all of the following  
provisions:  
(a) Establish a WET limitation or limitations consistent with subrule (5) of this rule,  
except as provided in subdivision (d) of this subrule, to assure both of the following:  
(i) Attainment of the acute WET provisions of subrule (1)(a) of this rule. (ii)  
Attainment of the chronic WET provisions of subrule (1)(b) of this rule. (b) Specify,  
in the national pollutant discharge elimination system  
(NPDES) permit for existing dischargers, on a case-by-case basis, a  
requirement to perform a toxicity reduction evaluation if representative  
toxicity data indicate persistent exceedance of the WET limitation.  
(c) Allow, with respect to any WET limitation established under subdivision  
(a) of this subrule, an appropriate schedule of compliance consistent with R  
323.1217.  
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